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I have to write a class for the force between two planetary objects (Newtons law of Gravity) and then create a subclass for coulombs law of attraction between two charged particles. For those who do not do physics these are similar functions (methods). Here is my code:

class Gravity:
     def __init__(self, m, M):
          self.m=m
          self.M=M
          self.G=6.67428E-11
     def force(self, r):
          G, m, M = self.G, self.m, self.M
          return (G*m*M)/(r**2)
     def visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100):
          import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
          from numpy import linspace
          r = linspace(r_start, r_stop, n)
          g = self.force(r)
          plt.plot(r,g)
          set_title='Gravity force: m=%g, M=%g' % (self.m, self.M)
          plt.show ()

and my subclass

class Coulomb(Gravity):
     def __init__(self, q1, q2):
          Gravity.__init__(self, q1, q2)
          self.G= 8.99E+9
     def force(self, r):
          Gravity.force(self, r)
     def visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100):
          Gravity.visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100)

then I try to get it to plot this coulombs law using the visualize method with the following code

l = Coulomb(2.63E-9, 8.69E-9)   #My two charges q1 and q2
w = l.visualize(0.1, 1)         #My start and end points for the linspace

I am a physics student, not a programmer so I imagine this looks a complete mess, however I know that the superclass works on it's own to produce an inverse square plot but when I run it with both sets of code in the same .py file (in the order shown above) I get the error message "x and y must have same first dimension" which I take to mean that my two plotting arguments are not of the same size but I can't figure out why they are not. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

Didn't get any responses but thanks anyway. I managed to write something which works. I will post my code here for any other poor Physics students forced to do programming and who are stuck on a similar problem. I imagine my solution is rather ugly but it did get me there. If anyone wants to edit it or anything to make it better then please feel free.

class Gravity:
      """Gravity force between two physical objects."""
      def __init__(self, m, M):
            self.m=m
            self.M=M
            self.G=6.67428E-11
      def force(self, r):
            G, m, M = self.G, self.m, self.M
            return (G*m*M)/(r**2)
      def visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100):
            import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
            from numpy import linspace
            r = linspace(r_start, r_stop, n)
            g = self.force(r)
            plt.plot(r,g)
            set_title='Gravity force: m=%g, M=%g' % (self.m, self.M)
            plt.show ()

and the sub class

class Coulomb(Gravity):
    def __init__(self, q1, q2):
        Gravity.__init__(self, q1, q2)
        self.G= 8.99E+9
    def force(self, r):
        G, m, M = self.G, self.m, self.M
        return (G*m*M)/(r**2)
    def visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100):
        Gravity.visualize(self, r_start, r_stop, n = 100)

Then I called the visualize method with

l = Coulomb(2.63E-9, 8.69E-9)    #two arbitrary charges
w = l.visualize(0.1, 1)          #start and end points for linspace for r

This resulted in a nice inverse square type plot. Hope this helps somebody.

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