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I'm writing applications and libraries simultaneously, and whenever I update a library it's a bit hard to get it recognized in the consumer application. I have open a separate Visual Studio instance for each library and application. After rebuilding a library I get in the consumer applications the warning/error below. I then either have to remove the reference and add it again. Or I have to clean and build the library solution 3-4 times, for such warning/error to disappear in the consumer app VS solution. Why would doing that 4 times make any difference to doing it 1 or 2 times..?

Would like to understand why this happens and if something can be done to make this work more smoothly?

Not sure if it's relevant but most of my applications I write in VB.NET and libaries in C# (as I'm in progress of changing everything to C#). I also have C# files from the libraries open in the consumer application VS, as it pops up during debugging. I also reference library dlls in the library project /bin/Debug folder, because I'm making a lot of changes at this point of development.

Warning 1 Namespace or type specified in the Imports 'somelibrary' doesn't contain any public member or cannot be found. Make sure the namespace or the type is defined and contains at least one public member. Make sure the imported element name doesn't use any aliases. 'local path'

..

Error 72 Unable to load referenced library 'path\somelibrary.dll': The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process.

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Why have separate visual studio instances open? Just include both projects in the same solution. –  Bobson Nov 21 '12 at 15:17
    
@Bobson This is correct - explained what's happening, and this is the ultimate solution unless you consistently want to keep closing and opening instances. –  LukeHennerley Nov 21 '12 at 15:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm writing applications and libraries simultaneously, and whenever I update a library it's a bit hard to get it recognized in the consumer application. I have open a separate Visual Studio instances for each library and application.

This is the fundamental source of your problem. Visual Studio does not like it when things outside it's control change. You should have a single solution open with all the relevant projects included in it. Then when something changes, all the projects which depend on that project will automatically be rebuilt. (At least, that's the default.)

After rebuilding a library I get in the consumer applications the warning/error below. I then either have to remove the reference and add it again. Or I have to clean and build the library solution 3-4 times, for such warning/error to disappear in the consumer app VS solution. Why would doing that 4 times make any difference to doing it 1 or 2 times..?

I don't think it has anything to do with how many times you clean and rebuild it, but how long it's been since you last made a change - you have to wait long enough for the VS instance building the dll to release the lock on the file, before the VS instance that is using it is able to access it.

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Maybe you're right it is a locking issue. But the reference updates automatically in the consumer project VS instance, without touching it, after a few clean/rebuilds of the library (immediately after the last one). So it's not about a certain time after the library clean/rebuild. Tried to wait 10 minutes, still had to build 3 times after that. But it may still be a factor that for some reason the file is sometimes remained locked, and sometimes not.. (?) –  bretddog Nov 21 '12 at 17:35
    
@bretddog - It's entirely possible that it's something else related-to-but-not locking. Without the specifics of how the project/solution is set up, though, I don't think we can track it down. If you still have issues after adding the project into the solution, then you might be able to find a better answer. But multiple VS instances is a very unusual scenario. –  Bobson Nov 21 '12 at 22:21
    
I see. I'll switch to the practice of single solution. thanks! –  bretddog Nov 21 '12 at 22:49

When you build a project you lock up the .DLL file in the project you build it from, because that is the version of the assembly that the library instance of visual studio will use - however you are referencing that very same library in another process hence the reason you are seeing the error.

You have two options, keep having two instances and then close the two instances open them again and it will be fine.

What you are better off doing is adding the project itself you are referencing (and are getting the error for) to your solution. Then instead of referencing YourProject/bin/debug/assembly.dll add a reference to the local project via the Projects tab. This will then keep one process referencing the appropriate assemblies that it needs.

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For every project in the solution check the project settings -> Compile tab -> advanced compile options... -> target framework(all configurations), see if they are all (for example) .NET framework 4. having different or the wrong framework might cause the problems you're having right now

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