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I'm building a Jquery Plugin. My skeleton code is as below:

(function (window, document, $, undefined) {

    var methods = {
        init : function(options){
        },
        func_1: function(){
        },
        func_2: function(){
        }
    };

    $.fn.myplugin = function(args){

        if ( methods[args] )
        {
            return methods[ args ].apply( this, Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ));
        }
        else if ( typeof args === 'object' || ! args ) 
        {
            var opts = $.extend({}, $.fn.myplugin.defaults, args);
            var new_args = new Array(opts);
            return methods.init.apply( this, new_args );
        }
        else 
        {
            $.error( 'Method ' +  args + ' does not exist' );
        }
    };

    $.fn.myplugin.defaults = {
         func_1: function(){},
         func_2: function(){}
    };

}(window, document, jQuery));

I'm looking to extend this plugin so that I may add additional functions to JQuery. So, I want to have these functions called as below:

$.myplugin.new_func();

How do I do this? I know I probably have to use $.extend but not sure how to go about it.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
are you willing to modify the plugin's code? –  Jarry Nov 21 '12 at 15:24
    
Wouldn't $.myplugin = methods; be enough? –  sroes Nov 21 '12 at 15:28
    
@Jarry No I have to keep the skeleton as is –  Obinwanne Hill Nov 21 '12 at 16:12
    
@SanderRoesink I know I can call my methods using $().myplugin('method_name'), but I'd rather not just to make things easier for my userbase. –  Obinwanne Hill Nov 21 '12 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

The difference between $.fn.myplugin and $.myplugin is that the latter doesn't have any context. So you can define the latter using the following code. In order to use chaining on the result of $.myplugin you just need to return an object that you would like to use the .new_func() method on, for example a certain jQuery object.

$.myplugin = function () {
   ...
   return $('body');
};
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Well I don't really want to use the method on the DOM, I just want to be able to call it like I've just described. I already have $(selector).myplugin(options) for DOM manipulation. –  Obinwanne Hill Nov 21 '12 at 16:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, after going through some older JQuery plugins (FancyBox 2 especially), I managed to figure out a way to do this. Below is the entire skeleton code:

(function (window, document, $, undefined) {

    var methods = {
        init : function(options){
        },
        func_1: function(){
        },
        func_2: function(){
        }
    };

    $.fn.myplugin = function(args){

        if ( methods[args] )
        {
            return methods[ args ].apply( this, Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ));
        }
        else if ( typeof args === 'object' || ! args ) 
        {
            var opts = $.extend({}, $.fn.myplugin.defaults, args);
            var new_args = new Array(opts);
            return methods.init.apply( this, new_args );
        }
        else 
        {
            $.error( 'Method ' +  args + ' does not exist' );
        }
    };

    $.fn.myplugin.defaults = {
        func_1:     function(){},
        func_2:     function(){}
    };

    //below is the code I added to get the desired functionality
    var D = $.myplugin = function(){};
    $.extend(D, {
        new_func: function(){
            //add functionality here
        }
    });

}(window, document, jQuery));

It is also possible to define a function (called new_func or whatever) inside methods object, and then call it down below from your new function using methods.new_func().

Cheers.

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