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Problem Statement:

I want to sort an std::vector of a structure using my custom sorting criteria.

The structure is:

struct Node
{
   int x;
   int y;
   float value;
}

I have a vector

std::vector<Node> vec;

My custom sorting criteria is that the vector should first be sorted by y and then by x. (Just like in Microsoft Excel)

Example:

Input

x y

5 6
2 4
1 1
1 0
8 10
4 7
7 1
5 4
6 1
1 4
3 10
7 2

Output:

x y

1 0
1 1
6 1
7 1
7 2
1 4
2 4
5 4
5 6
4 7
3 10
8 10

Can the above mentioned sorting be achieved through any of the C++ Standard Library sorting functions? If not, then is there any other library which I can use?

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1  
yes, you can use std::sort with a custom functor. See example here cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/sort –  user1773602 Nov 21 '12 at 15:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do it using std::sort using a comparison function.

bool comparison(const Node& node1, const Node& node2)
{
    if (node1.y < node2.y) return true;
    if (node1.y == node2.y) return node1.x < node2.x;

    return false;
}

int main() {
    std::sort(vec.begin(), vec.end(), comparison);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Swap x and y over. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 21 '12 at 15:49
    
@sftrabbit: Good catch. Thanks! Fixed it –  aam1r Nov 21 '12 at 15:51
1  
I would add remarks that you can use any functor (and with C++11 lambda functions) –  phresnel Nov 21 '12 at 15:59
    
wow, thankyou so much. I tried with a comparator function but did not think of this logic for comparison. :) –  sgarizvi Nov 21 '12 at 16:29

std::sort takes a custom comparison function. I haven't tested this, but yours might look something like:

bool cmp (const Node& lhs, const Node& rhs)
{
    if ( lhs.y < rhs.y ) return true;
    else if ( lhs.y == rhs.y ) return ( lhs.x < rhs.x );
    else return false;
}
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In general, implementing comparison operators (and functions) for multiple fields is more clearly expressed in terms of tie when lexicographical ordering is required.

static bool compare(Node const& l, Node const& r) {
    // Note the alignment so that both expressions only differ in their `l` and `r` ?
    return std::tie(l.y, l.x)
         < std::tie(r.y, r.x);
}

However, even that leaves some duplication and route for inconsistency. The following helper sees to that:

static std::tuple<int&,int&> tuplize(Node const& n) { return std::tie(n.y, n.x); }

which can then be applied simply:

static bool compare(Node const& l, Node const& r) {
    return tuplize(l) < tuplize(r);
}

Taaadaaam :)

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