Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Many people don't like to use instanceof, but I find that in many cases we have few other options when it comes to the equals method. Take a look at the class below:

class A {   
    int n;
    public A(int n) { this.n = n; }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        return false;
    }

    public boolean equals(A o) {
        return n == o.n;
    }   
}

I've never seen something like this done, but could it serve as a replacement for having to use instanceof to test if an Object is an A? Or are there other problems that I'm not thinking of?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm curious, why not use instanceof? Even the examples that use something like EqualsBuilder have instanceof. –  Sérgio Michels Nov 21 '12 at 16:07
    
Didn't get the reason to not using it. I always use it in games. –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Nov 21 '12 at 16:10
1  
@Peter is correct, the overloaded method is not dynamically bound, so this method will rarely get called in typical usage. stackoverflow.com/questions/321864/… –  Robin Nov 21 '12 at 16:11
    
I have nothing against instanceof, I was just curious about this question. –  arshajii Nov 21 '12 at 16:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

could it serve as a replacement for having to use instanceof to test if an Object is an A?

No. This is because the method called is chosen staticly i.e. only equals(object o) will be called in most situations.

You can write

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    return o instanceof A && n == ((A) o).n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yup. instanceof is exactly what you should be using in equals methods. –  Louis Wasserman Nov 21 '12 at 16:06
    
Seems like you're the one who always answers my questions! So thanks again. –  arshajii Nov 21 '12 at 16:23

The collections, Swing components and other classes that use equals will still call the equals(Object o) version and that will return false always.

The example will work when explicitly calling the equals(A o) method only.

share|improve this answer

This block of code is overloading not overriding equals. Also don't forget to check for o == null. Alternates to instanceof include getClass().equals(other.getClass()) and using A.isAssignableFrom(other.getClass())

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.