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I have some code that opens a spreadsheet, reads some values, and then closes the sheet. I need to do this for multiple files. The problem I'm having is that the Excel application instance is not exiting, therefore when I run my process for several files, I end up with several excel.exe processes running. Any ideas how I get Excel to close?

    static void ParseFile(string file)
    {
        try
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("parsing:" + file);
            Excel.Application excel = new Excel.Application();
            Excel.Workbook wb = excel.Workbooks.Open(file);
            Excel.Worksheet ws = wb.Worksheets[1];
            for (int i = 2; i < 27; i++)
            {
                log(ws.Cells[i, 1].Text);
            }
            wb.Close(false);                
            excel.Quit();
            excel = null;
            ws = null;
            wb = null;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log(ex.Message);
        }
    }

------Update 12/11/12--------Still leaving excel instances open-------

static void ParseFile(string file)
    {
        try
        {
            log("parsing:" + file);
            Excel.Application excel = new Excel.Application();
            Excel.Workbook wb = excel.Workbooks.Open(file);
            Excel.Worksheet ws = wb.Worksheets[1];
    //do some stuff here
            wb.Close(false);
            excel.Quit();
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(ws);
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(wb);
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(excel);                
            excel = null;
            ws = null;
            wb = null;
            System.GC.Collect();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log(ex.Message);
        }            
    }
share|improve this question
1  
You need to perform a bit of cleanup to release the resources you're using. This answer should help you out. –  Sid Holland Nov 21 '12 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

  1. Use Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject() to release the resources

  2. If you read multiple files one after the other then performance wise it is much better to open/close Excel Application only once and move the open/close application part to separate functions

Refactored Code:

static Excel.Application OpenExcel(){
    Excel.Application excel = null;
    try{
        excel = new Excel.Application();
        return excel;
    }
    catch(Exception ex){
        log(ex.Message);
        return null;
    }
}

static void ParseFile(string file)
{
    try
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("parsing:" + file);            
        Excel.Workbook wb = excel.Workbooks.Open(file);
        Excel.Worksheet ws = wb.Worksheets[1];
        for (int i = 2; i < 27; i++)
        {
            log(ws.Cells[i, 1].Text);
        }
        wb.Close(false);    
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        log(ex.Message);
    }
    finally{
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(ws);
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(wb);
        ws = null;
        wb = null;
    }
}

static void CloseExcel(Excel.Application excel){
    try{
        excel.Quit();
    }
    catch(Exception ex){
        log(ex.Message);
    }
    finally{
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(excel);
        excel = null;
    }
}

Usage:

Excel.Application excel = OpenExcel();
if(excel != null){
    // Parse files in a loop
    ParseFile("fileName");

    // Close excel after parsing all files
    CloseExcel(excel);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you tested this? The object that is returned from OpenExcel will already be completely released from the managed realm by FinalReleaseComObject! –  Paulo Madeira Nov 22 '12 at 16:12
    
It is not tested though, answer edited. –  Coder Nov 22 '12 at 20:52
    
This code didn't work for me, it still left instances of Excel running... confused –  tuj Dec 3 '12 at 12:38
    
How does ParseFile() access the excel variable? Is this a global or class level variable? –  User Jun 4 at 0:08
    
A class variable, the main purpose was to tell OP to refactor the code in separate functions. –  Coder Jun 6 at 7:44

You can use a wrapper object around the actual COM object that implements IDisposable, so that it can be used with C#'s using statement.

The benefit of this is that it'll promote readable code and it'll work for any COM object. Here's an example with runtime dispatching:

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public class ComRef<T> : IDisposable where T : class
{
    private T reference;

    public T Reference
    {
        get
        {
            return reference;
        }
    }

    public ComRef(T o)
    {
        reference = o;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (reference != null)
        {
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(reference);
            reference = null;
        }
    }
}

public class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Type excelAppType = Type.GetTypeFromProgID("Excel.Application");
        using (var comRef = new ComRef<object>(Activator.CreateInstance(excelAppType)))
        {
            var excel = comRef.Reference;
            // ...
            excel.GetType().InvokeMember("Quit", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, excel, null);
        }
    }
}

If, however, you already have imported Excel's type library, or any other type library for that matter, you might want something a bit more friendly:

public class CoClassComRef<T> : ComRef<T> where T : class, new()
{
    public CoClassComRef() : base(new T())
    {
    }
}

public class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using (var comRef = new CoClassComRef<Excel.Application>())
        {
            var excel = comRef.Reference;
            // ...
            excel.Quit();
        }
    }
}

You should just make sure that you don't capture comRef.Reference to some field or variable that outlives the using statement.

Note that I haven't given much thought about thread safety and a proper Dispose implementation. Thread safety isn't important if you only use a ComRef with using statements. A proper Dispose implementation would colaborate with a finalizer, but there's no need for that here, as using is basically a try-finally. If you use a ComRef not in a using statement and Dispose is not called, the ComRef will simply be garbage collected, and with it the underlying COM object, which will be released if only this ComRef was referencing it.

Finally, I didn't use Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject, because that is made when you're absolutely sure you want to release the underlying COM object (at least, all references from the managed environment) no matter how many times it has (re)entered the managed world. However, if you feel lucky, you may just create a new constructor which also receives a boolean stating if FinalReleaseComObject should be called instead of ReleaseComObject. The first results on a web search for any of these methods will point to articles and blog posts detailing why they are usually evil, one more than the other.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, here is my revised code; it's still leaving Excel.exe instances running after the program exits. –  tuj Dec 11 '12 at 12:41
    
@tuj, I'll comment on your answer, then. –  Paulo Madeira Dec 12 '12 at 14:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ended up killing the processes, that was the only thing that worked.

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, out uint lpdwProcessId);

    /// <summary> Tries to find and kill process by hWnd to the main window of the process.</summary>
    /// <param name="hWnd">Handle to the main window of the process.</param>
    /// <returns>True if process was found and killed. False if process was not found by hWnd or if it could not be killed.</returns>
    public static bool TryKillProcessByMainWindowHwnd(int hWnd)
    {
        uint processID;
        GetWindowThreadProcessId((IntPtr)hWnd, out processID);
        if (processID == 0) return false;
        try
        {
            Process.GetProcessById((int)processID).Kill();
        }
        catch (ArgumentException)
        {
            return false;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return false;
        }            
        return true;
    }

    static void ParseFile(string file)
    {
        try
        {
            log("parsing:" + file);
            Excel.Application excel = new Excel.Application();
            Excel.Workbook wb = excel.Workbooks.Open(file);
            Excel.Worksheet ws = wb.Worksheets[1];
            //do some stuff here
            wb.Close(false);
            int hWnd = excel.Application.Hwnd;
            excel.Quit();
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(ws);
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(wb);
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(excel);                
            excel = null;
            ws = null;
            wb = null;
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
            TryKillProcessByMainWindowHwnd(hWnd);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            log(ex.Message);
        }            
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Note that excel.Workbooks returns a COM object which is not assigned to any variable. You're not in total control of its lifetime, and most important, you can't explicitly IUnknown::Release it. The same goes for wb.Worksheets. Moreover, the do some stuff here may be holding to other objects, which I highly suspect. When you kill Excel, you're ruining any living references to such objects. It may work for you, because all it's left for them is to be released, in which case either the .NET's RCWs or COM's IPC may simply muffle certain errors when the local server is dead. –  Paulo Madeira Dec 12 '12 at 14:53
    
(cont.) Such error muffling is likely to happen only when your application is exiting. You may want to consider reviewing your code that uses Excel objects to make sure you're not keeping references to any of them (even a single one) anywhere. If you might, try to use the ComRef/CoClassComRef I've shown for every object you grab. It's ugly, it'll add indentation, but if it's not that much code, it might be feasible and it might finalize what's currently outliving the ParseFile method. –  Paulo Madeira Dec 12 '12 at 15:00
    
Thanks, this works for me. –  Jonas Wik Oct 22 '13 at 14:00
    
-1 Shouldn't be necessary to kill the process. Have a look at this good answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/17367411/… It should be possible to capture each COM object used along the way, and release it individually with Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject. As @acelent indicates, anything else that's using the Excel instance will be affected when killing the process, and there may be resources that don't get cleaned up properly, too. –  CJBS Feb 26 at 21:44

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