Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have around 600 files named like the IP address of the machines they have information on and with a .dgt extension. I'm trying to search a parameter in those files and extract 2 lines from those files if a given parameter is correct. I'm using a aix console and after some search I found the sedcommand in here. I leave you with an example of my search.

sed -n -e '/XP/,$p' 181* > machines1

sed -e '/XP/,$d' 181* > machines1

To be more specific, in the diretory I have a file listing of all my enterprise machines and it goes like this:

181xxxxxxxxx.dgt
181xxxxxxxxx.dgt
181xxxxxxxxx.dgt
181xxxxxxxxx.dgt

and they contain information like this:

MachineName= M125EEE
...
...
...
CurrentIP=XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
...
...
OS=XP
...
...
...

I'm trying to get a list of all machines that have XP installed, so I'm trying to extract the OS line and the MachineName line so I can obtain a file like this...

MachineName= M125EEE
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEE
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEF
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEG
OS=XP
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Try this:

awk '
BEGIN{ FS=OFS="=" }
{ map[FILENAME,$1] = $2 }
END {
   for (file in ARGV) {
      if ( map[file,"OS"] == "XP" ) {
         tag="MachineName"; print tag, map[file,tag]
         tag="OS";          print tag, map[file,tag]
         tag="CurrentIP";   print tag, map[file,tag]
      }
   }
}
' 181*

Make the simple, obvious tweaks to output whatever values you like...

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is not as runtime efficient as some of the other solutions, but for such a small number of files, this simple to understand solution may be appropriate:

grep -h MachineName $(grep -l OS=XP 181*)

grep -l means only print the names of the files that match. We then use those files names as a list of files to search for the MachineName line (-h means suppress filenames).

share|improve this answer
    
Tested and work in perfection, just added a '' > machines1 '' so i could extract the data via ftp. –  NmRfG Nov 22 '12 at 10:09
add comment

Edit:

This will do what requested, but simplier (shorter) than 1st version:

sed -ne '/^MachineName=/h;/^OS=XP/{x;G;p}' 181*dgt >machines

give the same as 1st following answer:

Fist answer

This would do the job:

sed -ne '/^MachineName=/{h};/^OS=/{/=XP/!d;x;G;p;d;h}' 181*.dgt >machines
cat machines
MachineName= M125EEE
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEE
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEF
OS=XP
MachineName= M125EEG
OS=XP

but if you don't need to print OS=XP each time, as this is the only string matching, you could keep them out:

sed -ne '/^MachineName=/{h};/^OS=XP$/{g;p}' 181*.dgt >machines
cat machines
MachineName= M125EEE
MachineName= M125EEE
MachineName= M125EEF
MachineName= M125EEG

and if you want only machine names but no MachineName=, you could:

sed -ne '/^MachineName=/{s/^.*= *//;h};/^OS=XP$/{g;p}' 181*.dgt >machines
cat machines
M125EEE
M125EEE
M125EEF
M125EEG
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, i tested you answer and all i came out with was that the command could not be parsed. any chance it´s the bash version? –  NmRfG Nov 22 '12 at 10:06
    
What's your environ (OS, version...) I'm using Debian, bash 4.1.5, sed 4.2.1 but have tested on 4.2.20 (with sed 4.2.1), give the same result... Maybe whith double quotes instead of single... or as sed script: echo $'#!/bin/sed -nf\n\n/^MachineName=/{s/^.*= *//;h};\n/^OS=XP$/{g;p}' >extract-os.sed , chmod +x extract-os.sed, ./extract-os.sed 181*dgt –  F. Hauri Nov 22 '12 at 12:26
    
It worked as a sed script, thanks –  NmRfG Dec 3 '12 at 10:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.