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I have a big data set of floating point numbers. I iterate through them and evaluate np.log(x) for each of them. I get

RuntimeWarning: divide by zero encountered in log

I would like to get around this and return to 0 if this error occurs.

I am thinking of define a new function:

def safe_ln(x):
    #returns: ln(x) but replaces -inf with 0
    l = np.log(x)
    #if l = -inf:
    l = 0
    return result

Basically i need a way of testing that the output is "-inf" but I don't know how to proceed. Thank you for your help!

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2  
I would start by returning an actual variable instead of the nonexistent result –  Junuxx Nov 21 '12 at 16:42
    
sorry, i just wrote this as an example :) –  Julia Nov 21 '12 at 16:42
    
you can edit your question –  bmu Nov 21 '12 at 17:16
1  
Because of the way your question is written ("iterate through the array"), I think you're not using NumPy properly, and what you're doing (and the accepted solution) are many orders of magnitude slower than the common solution. –  jorgeca Nov 21 '12 at 17:21
    
is your input from a numpy array (that is: is the argument x in safe_ln a value from a numpy array? –  bmu Nov 21 '12 at 17:22
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since the log for x=0 is minus infinite, I'd simply check if the input value is zero and return whatever you want there:

def safe_ln(x):
    if x <= 0:
        return 0
    return math.log(x)

EDIT: small edit: you should check for all values smaller than or equal to 0.

EDIT 2: np.log is of course a function to calculate on a numpy array, for single values you should use math.log. This is how the above function looks with numpy:

def safe_ln(x, minval=0.0000000001):
    return np.log(x.clip(min=minval))
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2  
you shouldn't do this with the elements of a numpy array. with numpy you should use vectorized functions and indexing. However it is not clear what type x is from the question. –  bmu Nov 21 '12 at 17:32
    
@bmu: You are right, I fixed my answer. –  Constantinius Nov 22 '12 at 8:44
    
Each of your safe_ln do a different thing (the last one returns -inf for xi in x if x <= 0) –  jorgeca Nov 22 '12 at 13:11
    
@jorgeca: You are right, I need o clip to a value above 0. –  Constantinius Nov 22 '12 at 16:51
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You are using a np function, so I can safely guess that you are working on a numpy array? Then the most efficient way to do this is to use the where function instead of a for loop

myarray= np.random.randint(10,size=10)
result = np.where(myarray>0, np.log(myarray), 0)

otherwise you can simply use the log function and then patch the hole:

myarray= np.random.randint(10,size=10)
result = np.log(myarray)
result[result==-np.inf]=0

The np.log function return correctly -inf when used on a value of 0, so are you sure that you want to return a 0? if somewhere you have to revert to the original value, you are going to experience some problem, changing zeros into ones...

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Excellent! That's pretty much the answer I was writing. Though, it should be np.where instead of where. For me this is like two orders of magnitude faster, even for small arrays. –  jorgeca Nov 21 '12 at 18:17
    
I feel @EnricoGiampieri 's approach is more correct than the answer you accepted. Nice illustration of numpy.where(), btw :) –  Alex I Nov 21 '12 at 19:54
1  
You're right, I got it wrong working with the "from numpy import *" ;) For the gain in speed, that's the power of numpy: as long as you stay inside it, it works at C speed. If you want to feel a real burst of power, try to combine it with the numexpr library, which optimize for cache and multi-processors ;) * from numexpr import evaluate as ev * ev("where(myarray>0, np.log(myarray), 0)") –  EnricoGiampieri Nov 21 '12 at 19:56
    
numexpr is amazing at what it does. In this case, it starts being faster than numpy for arrays of size 1000 on, and ends up being 8 times faster from around 1e5 elements, in my laptop. (By the way, it should be log inside the string expression, not np.log, numexpr is not really using the log function from numpy) –  jorgeca Nov 21 '12 at 21:57
    
I have run the first solution and works properly, but it outputs a warning: RuntimeWarning: divide by zero encountered in log. If I run it again in the same terminal session, the warning doesn't appear. Is this normal? The where is supposed not ro run the log if the value is 0! –  Roger Veciana Jul 24 '13 at 9:25
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You can do this.

def safe_ln(x):
   try:
      l = np.log(x)
   except ZeroDivisionError:
      l = 0
   return l
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you could do:

def safe_ln(x):
    #returns: ln(x) but replaces -inf with 0
    try:
        l = np.log(x)
    except RunTimeWarning:
        l = 0
    return l
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add comment

use exception handling:

In [27]: def safe_ln(x):
    try:
        return math.log(x)
    except ValueError:       # np.log(x) might raise some other error though
        return float("-inf")
   ....:     

In [28]: safe_ln(0)
Out[28]: -inf

In [29]: safe_ln(1)
Out[29]: 0.0

In [30]: safe_ln(-100)
Out[30]: -inf
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your function does not actually do anything useful. –  Constantinius Nov 21 '12 at 16:45
    
@Constantinius that was just an example, solution updated. –  undefined is not a function Nov 21 '12 at 16:47
    
Mmm, this doesn't answer the question. –  jorgeca Nov 21 '12 at 18:25
    
@jorgeca will you explain how? –  undefined is not a function Nov 21 '12 at 18:28
    
You're doing what the 2nd edit from the accepted answer does, which is not what the OP is asking, but without using numpy, so it will also be much slower for (numpy) arrays. –  jorgeca Nov 22 '12 at 13:14
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