Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been looking around for a solution to this, but can't seem to find anything.

Basically I have a piece of code that I'm looking to scale up to large data, a sample extract of the code is below:

num_train <- 100
num_test <- 100

train <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_train), ID_train = 1:num_train, b_train = rnorm(num_train), c_train = rnorm(num_train), cat = sample(c("A", "B", "C", "D"), num_train, replace = TRUE))
test <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_test), ID_test = 1:num_test, b_test = rnorm(num_test), c_test = rnorm(num_test))

df <- merge(test,train, by="k")

This runs exactly how I want it to and extremely fast when I use it on bigger data. (Maybe as big as num_train * num_test = 2,000,000,000...)

However the trouble is the resulting data table grows by num_train*num_test rows, and so is soon too big for R to handle.

num_train <- 1000
num_test <- 10000

train <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_train), ID_train = 1:num_train, b_train = rnorm(num_train), c_train = rnorm(num_train), cat = sample(c("A", "B", "C", "D"), num_train, replace = TRUE))
test <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_test), ID_test = 1:num_test, b_test = rnorm(num_test), c_test = rnorm(num_test))

df <- merge(test,train, by="k")

>Error: cannot allocate vector of size 76.3 Mb

I'm aware of all the memory constraints of R and packages such as filehash, ff and bigmemory (not overly familiar, have used some of them a little). These seem to allow you to set up big files as databases and read the data from them efficiently.

But basically what I'm wondering is, is there any way to manage creating a big table from tables that are already in memory, like writing bits of it to hard disk as it's created? Would any of these packages work for this? Are there any other solutions?

Or is this job just not for R?

Cheers!

share|improve this question
    
figure out how much of a 'chunk' you can store without overloading your computer's ram, then create one chunk at a time -- appending it to a ff, bigmemory, or database-backed (sql) table that doesn't take up any space in ram. then delete the current chunk in memory, and move on to the next. –  Anthony Damico Nov 21 '12 at 17:32
    
Thanks, that's an approach I'm looking into now. For the purposes of what I'm doing I can process it in chunks, but only the test dataset. It needs to be applied to the entire training dataset. So as the training dataset gets > 10,000, I'll need to chunk the training dataset into sub 500 row chunks and loop through until everything is processed... this kind of negates the speed achieved with the data.tables package. –  Ger Nov 21 '12 at 17:56
    
Good question. Agreed with Anthony. I did a quick calc: 2e9 * 9 columns * 8 bytes / 1024^3 = 134 GB, so yes, you're into investigating the packages you mentioned. Unless you can find a machine with that much RAM, or a VM that can allocate you that on a cluster or something. This is an area that Revolution provide (closed source) tools for. –  Matt Dowle Nov 21 '12 at 18:05
1  
Instead of merge(x,y) perhaps try x[y,<process chunk>] syntax instead. That's where by-without-by (see ?data.table) might give you an opportunity to chunk it. –  Matt Dowle Nov 21 '12 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use package ff and ffbase for this. It does not require your data to be in RAM as is the case for data.table. The following script will generate your 10Mio rows x 10 columns data.frame.

num_train <- 1000
num_test <- 10000
train <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_train), ID_train = 1:num_train, b_train =     rnorm(num_train), c_train = rnorm(num_train), cat = sample(c("A", "B", "C", "D"), num_train,     replace = TRUE))
test <- data.table(k = rep(1,num_test), ID_test = 1:num_test, b_test = rnorm(num_test),     c_test = rnorm(num_test))


train <- data.frame(unclass(train), stringsAsFactors=TRUE)
test <- data.frame(unclass(test), stringsAsFactors=TRUE)
require(ffbase)
train$id <- seq_len(nrow(train))
test$id <- seq_len(nrow(test))
train <- as.ffdf(data.frame(train, stringsAsFactors=TRUE))
test <- as.ffdf(data.frame(test, stringsAsFactors=TRUE))
x <- expand.ffgrid(train$id, test$id)
dim(x)
names(x) <- c("train.id", "test.id")
x <- merge(x, train, by.x="train.id", by.y="id", all.x=TRUE, all.y=FALSE)
x <- merge(x, test, by.x="test.id", by.y="id", all.x=TRUE, all.y=FALSE)
dim(x)
x[1:5, ]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I like this solution, I'm not entirely sure what's happening but it seems to work in the example you set up. The only think I'm wondering is how this would scale speed-wise (specifically the expand.ffgrid() step seems to be quite slow for 10,000*10,000). Could this be combined with the speed of data.tables anywhere? It seems I can either have a good speed/poor memory solution or poor speed/good memory... –  Ger Nov 21 '12 at 21:54
2  
Using package ff and ffbase is for out-of-memory solutions. This means your data is on disk and will be loaded chunk-wise in R and put to disk again. Of course RAM is always speedier. If you can get all your data in RAM, you don't need ff/ffbase. So the speed depends also on your hard disk. So a comparison with SQL or SAS is more suited. But for the sake of the argument, you can do the following. system.time(x <- expand.grid(as.ram(train$id), as.ram(test$id))) system.time(x <- as.ffdf(expand.grid(as.ram(train$id), as.ram(test$id)))) system.time(x <- expand.ffgrid(train$id, test$id)) –  jwijffels Nov 22 '12 at 8:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.