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I have a start end, and a step, I would like to create a list like this (start= 0, end = 300, step = 100):

[[1, 100], [101, 200], [201, 300]]

The start, end, and step will vary, so I have to dynamically create the list.

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What have you tried? –  Rohit Jain Nov 21 '12 at 17:47
    
Your list is inconsistent. You add 100 the first time, then 99 every other time.. –  Brendan Long Nov 21 '12 at 17:49
    
Should the first list be [1,100]? –  arshajii Nov 21 '12 at 17:50
    
Sorry guys, the start is 1, and the step in this sample is 99. It will vary. –  dtch Nov 21 '12 at 17:51
1  
@user1842734: Please edit your question to show the true input and output. –  KennyTM Nov 21 '12 at 17:55
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> start = 0
>>> end = 300
>>> step = 100
>>> [[1 + x, step + x] for x in range(start, end, step)]
[[1, 100], [101, 200], [201, 300]]
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black_dragon this is exactly what I need. Thank you! –  dtch Nov 21 '12 at 17:59
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You just need a simple while loop: -

start = 0
end = 300
step = 100

my_list = []

while start < end:   # Loop until you reach the end
    my_list.append([start + 1, start + step]) 
    start += step    # Increment start by step value to consider next group

print my_list

OUTPUT : -

[[1, 100], [101, 200], [201, 300]]

The same thing can be achieved by range or xrange function, in a list comprehension.

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Thank you all! You have been awesome! :-) –  dtch Nov 21 '12 at 18:05
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You can create two ranges and zip them together:

def do_your_thing(start, end, step):
    return zip(range(start, end - step + 2, step),
               range(start + step - 1, end + 1, step))
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