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I have 2 separate classes, but they both need to do one thing repetitively, in other words there is a common method. This is the method:

private String createButton (String cls, String value) {
        return "<input type=\"button\" class=\"" + cls + 
                   "\" value=\"" + value + "\" key=\"" + this.id + "\" />";
        }

so this is really just a one line method, so I could copy it into both classes. But I was wondering if there's a better way of doing that. I really don't want to have a super class with just that method, obviously. Also, I think it's silly creating another class just for the button and do: new Button(cls,value), isn't?

Another option I thought about is to have a utility class for the package, with a mix of helper functions. Does that make sense? Is it being done?

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3  
Well, you have already posted all your options in your question itself. –  Rohit Jain Nov 21 '12 at 18:04
    
Do not hard-code visual aspects of HTML inside code. Separate the view using a framework. If you wanted to change the input to a button or an a href, you now have to modify source code and recompile the application. If you abstract the HTML out of your code, you may find the need to call createButton disappears altogether. –  Dave Jarvis Nov 21 '12 at 18:08
    
Furthermore, utility classes often violate the principles that compose a good object-oriented design. See also: blogs.msdn.com/b/nickmalik/archive/2005/09/06/461404.aspx –  Dave Jarvis Nov 21 '12 at 18:11
1  
@MukulGoel he clearly knows how to accept an answer. no need to pressure him to accept answers that he doesn't think answers his questions –  Sam I am Nov 21 '12 at 18:16
2  
I agree with Dave Jarvis that a deeper problem is visible here when you consider the actual use case. Furthermore, in a more OO way, one could argue that the return value of the method is actually a button object that might be translated into a string. This is exactly the kind of abstraction that the mentioned frameworks provide and thus might completely remove the need for this construct in your "custom" code. –  Martin Klinke Nov 21 '12 at 18:17
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use a utility class... but it might become incohesive.

public class Utilities {

    /* What do these methods have in common? */

    public String createButton(...) {
        return "<input type='button' />";
    }

    public double calculateCircumference(Circle c) {
        return circle.getRadius() * 2 * Math.PI;
    }

}

This is the kind of code that leads down the dark road to a God Object.

Instead, consider scoping the purpose and intent of your "utility" class: consider making it a factory - specifically an Abstract Factory so that it retains cohesiveness.

public class HTMLWidgetFactory implements AbstractWidgetFactory<String> { // the interface might be overkill

    /* Oh! This class is clearly used to create HTML controls! */

    public String createButton(...) {
        return "<input type='button' />";
    }

    public String createImage(...) {
        return "<img src='lena.png' />";
    }

}
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yes, i like this idea of HTMLWidgetFactory. thanks! –  Moshe Shaham Nov 21 '12 at 18:21
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Yes, a utility class with helper functions is the right way to go here. You are going to have other requirements come up that will be shared utilities as well. They will all go in the utility class.

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I would suggest creating a utility class, depending on how big of a project it can be very efficient to have one class with all of your widely-used helpers. Here is an example of how I would go about it:

public class Util{

    private static final Util instance = new Util();

    public static Util getInstance(){
        return instance;
    }

    private Util(){}

    public String createButton (String cls, String value) {
        return "<input type=\"button\" class=\"" + cls + 
               "\" value=\"" + value + "\" key=\"" + this.id + "\" />";
    }
}
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Best Approach would be to make a utility package with a class with such helper methods that will be repeatedly used by different classes. Requirements add up, systems expand. Also the utility package could, if feasible be integrated with other projects (Reusability).

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-1 Seriously? What for? –  Mukul Goel Nov 21 '12 at 18:26
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Well, your particular function doesn't change any properties of the instance, do you can do something like:

public static String createButton (String cls, String value, int id) {
        return "<input type=\"button\" class=\"" + cls + 
                   "\" value=\"" + value + "\" key=\"" + id + "\" />";
        }
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You won't be able to use this.id in a static scope. –  Richard JP Le Guen Nov 21 '12 at 18:16
    
@RichardJPLeGuen fixed –  Sam I am Nov 21 '12 at 18:17
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