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Let me start out by saying I didn't design this database; just trying to work with it.

I'm trying to retrieve the failures for a set of bicycles, where the most important determining factor is whether any of the parts in the bicycle have a particular attribute. The attribute is set in the parts table. The part is part of an assembly, which has a reference to a bigger assembly. The assembly may have a particular bicycle type assigned to it; if it doesn't, we assume that ALL bicycle types are assigned to the assembly. The parts may also have specific bicycles assigned to them, identified by a serial number.

So, we can assume:

  1. A record in the failures table will always include a serial number, higher assembly, and bicycle type.
  2. A part's assembly will always have a reference to a higher assembly
  3. A part's assembly may or may not have references to bicycle types.
  4. A part may or may not have references to specific serial numbers

When searching for failures where there is a part with a particular attribute, if the part has references to particular bicycles, we only want to find those. If it doesn't, and the part's assembly has references to specific bicycle types, we only want to find failures related to the assemblies that have references to those types, and that contain those parts. Otherwise, we want to find all failures that are related to the higher assemblies that contain the parts.

My problem is that if I join on the serial numbers, I always get only parts with serial numbers assigned, and if I join on the bicycle types, I only get the parts whose assemblies have types assigned. I'm not sure whether I'm attempting something that's not realistic given the database design, or whether I'm approaching the joins incorrectly.

Following is the query so far.

SELECT f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly
FROM ( 
    SELECT DISTINCT f.f_bicycle_type, f.f_serial_number, f.f_big_assembly, p_important_attr 
    from failures f 
    left outer join (    
        select distinct bt.bt_bicycle_type, b_serial_number, a_big_assembly, p_important_attr  
        from (          
            select distinct b.b_serial_number, a.a_big_assembly, p.p_assembly_id, p.p_important_attr
            from parts p
            join assemblies a on p.p_assembly_id = a.a_assembly_id
            left outer join parts_bicycles b on b.b_part_id = p.p_id  
            where p.p_important_attr = 'awesome'
        ) p_join_a_and_b 
        left outer join assembly_bicycle_types bt on bt.bt_assembly_id = p_join_a_and_b.p_assembly_id 
    ) p_join_a_and_b_join_bt 
    on f.f_big_assembly = p_join_a_and_b_join_bt.a_big_assembly 
    -- problem join clause - if an explicit type has not been assigned to the assembly, we want to include ALL types
    and f_bicycle_type = p_join_a_and_b_join_bt.bt_bicycle_type
    -- problem join clause - there may not be explicit serial numbers assigned to a given part
    and f_serial_number = b_serial_number
) z
WHERE p_important_attr = 'awesome';

Test case sql (for Oracle):

CREATE TABLE failures (
f_bicycle_type VARCHAR(20),
f_serial_number NUMBER(20),
f_big_assembly VARCHAR(5)); 

CREATE TABLE parts (
p_id NUMBER(20),
p_assembly_id NUMBER(20),
p_important_attr VARCHAR(20));

CREATE TABLE assemblies (
a_assembly_id NUMBER(20),
a_big_assembly VARCHAR(5)); 

CREATE TABLE parts_bicycles (
b_part_id NUMBER(20),
b_serial_number NUMBER(20));    

CREATE TABLE assembly_bicycle_types (
bt_assembly_id NUMBER(20),
bt_bicycle_type VARCHAR(20));

INSERT ALL
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('tandem', 1000001, 'A1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('bmx', 1000002, 'A1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('tandem', 1000003, 'B1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('cruiser', 1000004, 'B1000')  
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('bmx', 1000005, 'C1000')  
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('motocross', 1000006, 'C1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('cruiser', 1000007, 'C1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('bmx', 1000008, 'D1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('bmx', 1000009, 'D1000')
INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('cruiser', 1000010, 'E1000')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (1, 1001, 'awesome')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (2, 1001, 'ordinary')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (3, 2001, 'awesome')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (4, 3001, 'awesome')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (5, 4001, 'awesome')
INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (6, 5001, 'ordinary')
INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (1001, 'A1000')
INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (2001, 'B1000')
INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (3001, 'C1000')
INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (4001, 'D1000')
INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (5001, 'E1000')
INTO parts_bicycles (b_part_id, b_serial_number)
VALUES (4, 1000005)
INTO parts_bicycles (b_part_id, b_serial_number)
VALUES (4, 1000006)
INTO parts_bicycles (b_part_id, b_serial_number)
VALUES (5, 1000008)
INTO assembly_bicycle_types (bt_assembly_id, bt_bicycle_type)
VALUES (02001, 'tandem')
INTO assembly_bicycle_types (bt_assembly_id, bt_bicycle_type)
VALUES (04001, 'bmx')
SELECT * FROM DUAL;

For MySQL:

 CREATE TABLE failures (
f_bicycle_type VARCHAR(20),
f_serial_number INTEGER(20),
f_big_assembly VARCHAR(5));
CREATE TABLE parts(
p_id INTEGER( 20 ) ,
p_assembly_id INTEGER( 20 ) ,
p_important_attr VARCHAR( 20 )
);
CREATE TABLE assemblies(
a_assembly_id INTEGER( 20 ) ,
a_big_assembly VARCHAR( 5 )
);
CREATE TABLE parts_bicycles(
b_part_id INTEGER( 20 ) ,
b_serial_number INTEGER( 20 )
);
CREATE TABLE assembly_bicycle_types(
bt_assembly_id INTEGER( 20 ) ,
bt_bicycle_type VARCHAR( 20 )
);

INSERT INTO failures (f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly)
VALUES ('tandem', 1000001, 'A1000'),('bmx', 1000002, 'A1000'), ('tandem', 1000003, 'B1000'),    ('cruiser', 1000004, 'B1000') ,('bmx', 1000005, 'C1000'), ('motocross', 1000006, 'C1000')
,('cruiser', 1000007, 'C1000')
,('bmx', 1000008, 'D1000')
,('bmx', 1000009, 'D1000')
, ('cruiser', 1000010, 'E1000');
insert INTO parts (p_id, p_assembly_id, p_important_attr)
VALUES (1, 1001, 'awesome'), (2, 1001, 'ordinary'), (3, 2001, 'awesome'), (4, 3001, 'awesome'), (5, 4001, 'awesome'),(6, 5001, 'ordinary');
INSERT INTO assemblies (a_assembly_id, a_big_assembly)
VALUES (1001, 'A1000'), (2001, 'B1000'), (3001, 'C1000'), (4001, 'D1000'),(5001, 'E1000');
    INSERT INTO parts_bicycles (b_part_id, b_serial_number)
VALUES (4, 1000005),(4, 1000006),(5, 1000008)
INSERT INTO assembly_bicycle_types (bt_assembly_id, bt_bicycle_type)
VALUES (02001, 'tandem'), (04001, 'bmx');

Sample data and desired results:

-- failures table
-- f_bicycle_type   || f_serial_number  || f_big_assembly
---------------------------------------------------------
  tandem               1000001             A1000
  bmx                  1000002             A1000
  tandem               1000003             B1000
  cruiser              1000004             B1000
  bmx                  1000005             C1000
  motocross            1000006             C1000
  cruiser              1000007             C1000
  bmx                  1000008             D1000
  bmx                  1000009             D1000
  cruiser              1000010             E1000

  -- parts table
  -- p_id   || p_assembly_id    || p_important_attr
  ------------------------------------------------
     1          1001                awesome
     2          1001                ordinary
     3          2001                awesome
     4          3001                awesome
     5          4001                awesome
     6          5001                ordinary

  -- assemblies table
  -- a_assembly_id  || a_big_assembly
  -----------------------------------
     1001              A1000
     2001              B1000
     3001              C1000
     4001              D1000
     5001              E1000

  -- parts_bicycles table
  -- b_part_id  || b_serial_number
  --------------------------------
     4              1000005
     4              1000006
     5              1000008

  -- assembly_bicycle_types table
  -- bt_assembly_id || bt_bicycle_type
  ------------------------------------
     02001             tandem
     04001             bmx

-- desired results from failures table
-- f_bicycle_type   || f_serial_number  || f_big_assembly
---------------------------------------------------------
  tandem               1000001             A1000
  bmx                  1000002             A1000
  tandem               1000003             B1000
  bmx                  1000005             C1000
      motocross            1000006             C1000
  bmx                  1000008             D1000

And the actual results, with the problem joins in place:

-- actual results from failures table
-- f_bicycle_type   || f_serial_number  || f_big_assembly
---------------------------------------------------------
  bmx                  1000008             D1000
share|improve this question
    
Are assemblies potentially recursive? If so, is 'assigned to all bike types' decided when there are no 'parent' assemblies? Also, could we please get your table layout? And possibly some sample data and desired results? –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 21 '12 at 19:21
    
@Clockwork, not recursive. Unfortunately, types are determined via either an absence of records in assembly_bike_types (meaning all possible bike types) or the presence of records. I know it's not optimal but the system architect is not letting me change it. Will probably not be able to give sample data/desired results until after the holidays. –  earachefl Nov 21 '12 at 22:50
    
I think your query would be easier to follow either without the nesting or with the nesting broken out into common table expressions (WITH clauses) in which at least the meaning of each block could be inferred from the name of the CTE. –  David Aldridge Nov 29 '12 at 13:38
    
I can't follow you becouse my poor english, so I only give you this fiddle that is near but not just your request :) notice or ... is null on joins –  Luis Siquot Nov 29 '12 at 14:23
8  
+1 for supplying the test data and create table statements. –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 29 '12 at 22:51

4 Answers 4

The following query returns your desired result set. Essentially, this build the relationships between parts, assemblies and bicycle types first, then performs a complex, prioritized join to failures to get the actual result.

SELECT DISTINCT f.f_bicycle_type, f.f_serial_number, f.f_big_assembly
FROM  parts p
      LEFT JOIN parts_bicycles pb
         ON p.p_id = pb.b_part_id
      LEFT JOIN assemblies a
         ON p.p_assembly_id = a.a_assembly_id
      LEFT JOIN assembly_bicycle_types abt
         ON a.a_assembly_id = abt.bt_assembly_id
      LEFT JOIN failures f
         ON -- First priority is parts that map directly
            pb.b_serial_number = f.f_serial_number 
            -- Second priority is assemblies that map to type
            OR (pb.b_serial_number IS NULL 
                AND abt.bt_bicycle_type = f.f_bicycle_type) 
            -- Third priority is assemblies that map directly
            OR (pb.b_serial_number IS NULL 
                AND abt.bt_bicycle_type IS NULL 
                AND a.a_big_assembly = f.f_big_assembly)
WHERE  p.p_important_attr = 'awesome'
ORDER BY f.f_serial_number  

SQL Fiddle

II don't think this addresses the issue where assemblies that are not assigned belong to all bicycles, but it's not clear from your sample data how that is intended to work.

share|improve this answer

This query joins parts, parts_bicycles, assemblies, assembly_bicycle_type. Let's save it as a view:

create view j_parts as
select p_important_attr, b_serial_number, a_big_assembly, bt_bicycle_type
from
  parts left join parts_bicycles
    on parts.p_id = parts_bicycles.b_part_id
  left join assemblies
    on parts.p_assembly_id=assemblies.a_assembly_id
  left join assembly_bicycle_types
    on assemblies.a_assembly_id =assembly_bicycle_types.bt_assembly_id

and this (i think!) is the query that gives you your desidered result:

SELECT failures.*
FROM
  failures inner join j_parts
  on f_serial_number=b_serial_number
     and p_important_attr = 'awesome'
UNION
SELECT failures.*
FROM
  failures inner join j_parts
  on f_big_assembly=a_big_assembly
     and b_serial_number is null
     and j_parts.bt_bicycle_type=f_bicycle_type
     and p_important_attr = 'awesome'
UNION
SELECT failures.*
FROM
  failures inner join j_parts
  on f_big_assembly=a_big_assembly
     and b_serial_number is null
     and j_parts.bt_bicycle_type is null
     and p_important_attr = 'awesome'

EDIT: i wanted to write it this way because it's easier to read and to mantain. Then the query can be optimized. Here there are all the conditions in just one select:

SELECT failures.*
FROM
  failures inner join
  (parts left join parts_bicycles
   on parts.p_id = parts_bicycles.b_part_id
   left join assemblies
   on parts.p_assembly_id=assemblies.a_assembly_id
   left join assembly_bicycle_types
   on assemblies.a_assembly_id =assembly_bicycle_types.bt_assembly_id)
  on f_serial_number=b_serial_number
     or (f_big_assembly=a_big_assembly
         and b_serial_number is null
         and (bt_bicycle_type=f_bicycle_type
              or bt_bicycle_type is null))
  and p_important_attr = 'awesome'
share|improve this answer
    
maybe there's still something to fix... but using this structure it shoud not be much difficult... –  fthiella Nov 29 '12 at 22:19
    
select * is a poor practice especially in a view where you have joins and the data would be repeated. lease do not use it anymore or suggest the use of a SQL antipattern. I do like your idea about using a union. –  HLGEM Nov 29 '12 at 22:21
    
@HLGEM you are right... now in the view i am selecting only the field that we need in the union query... thanks for your suggestion! –  fthiella Nov 29 '12 at 22:31
    
@fthiella, I also like your idea of using a union. Unfortunately, removing the "and p_important_attribute = 'awesome'" clauses from all occurrences in your first query doesn't give expected results - in that case, all the values in the failures table should be returned, but it's missing #4, 7, and 9. Will have a look at query #2 now. –  earachefl Dec 3 '12 at 17:17
    
@earachefl second query is the same as the first, but i substituted joins with or... the query with unions can be optimized a little (not all joins are needed in every select) but the second should be faster, but except for that... i am not sure why 4,7 and 9 should be returned... i'm still thinking if i can fix that... –  fthiella Dec 3 '12 at 19:36

There you go (PostgreSQL flavor):

WITH chosen_parts AS (
  SELECT * FROM parts LEFT JOIN parts_bicycles ON b_part_id = p_id 
    WHERE p_important_attr = 'awesome'
), chosen_assemblies AS (
  SELECT * FROM assemblies JOIN chosen_parts ON p_assembly_id = a_assembly_id 
    LEFT JOIN assembly_bicycle_types ON bt_assembly_id = a_assembly_id 
  WHERE b_serial_number IS NULL
)
SELECT failures.* FROM chosen_parts JOIN failures 
  ON f_serial_number = b_serial_number
UNION
SELECT failures.* FROM chosen_assemblies JOIN failures 
  ON f_big_assembly = a_big_assembly 
  WHERE bt_bicycle_type = f_bicycle_type
    OR bt_bicycle_type IS NULL;

Feel free to add an outer SELECT DISTINCT * FROM if duplicates are a concern.

share|improve this answer

modified query can be

SELECT f_bicycle_type, f_serial_number, f_big_assembly
FROM ( 
SELECT DISTINCT f.f_bicycle_type, f.f_serial_number, f.f_big_assembly, p_important_attr 
from failures f 
left outer join (    
    select distinct bt.bt_bicycle_type, b_serial_number, a_big_assembly, p_important_attr  
    from (          
        select distinct b.b_serial_number, a.a_big_assembly, p.p_assembly_id, p.p_important_attr
        from parts p
        join assemblies a on p.p_assembly_id = a.a_assembly_id
        left outer join parts_bicycles b on b.b_part_id = p.p_id  
        where p.p_important_attr = 'awesome'
    ) p_join_a_and_b 
    left join assembly_bicycle_types bt on bt.bt_assembly_id = p_join_a_and_b.p_assembly_id 
) p_join_a_and_b_join_bt 
on f.f_big_assembly = p_join_a_and_b_join_bt.a_big_assembly 
-- problem join clause - if an explicit type has not been assigned to the assembly, we want to include ALL types
and (f_bicycle_type = p_join_a_and_b_join_bt.bt_bicycle_type or p_join_a_and_b_join_bt.bt_bicycle_type is null)
-- problem join clause - there may not be explicit serial numbers assigned to a given part
and (f_serial_number = b_serial_number or b_serial_number is null)
) z
WHERE p_important_attr = 'awesome';
share|improve this answer

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