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I have a dynamically allocated array of polymorphic objects that I would like to resize without using STL library (vectors, etc). I've tried moving the original to a temporary array, then deleting the original, then setting the original equal to the temporary, like this:

int x = 100;
int y = 150;

Animal **orig = new Animal*[x];
Animal **temp = new Animal*[y];

//allocate orig array
for(int n = 0; n < x; n++)
{
    orig[n] = new Cat();
}

//save to temp
for(int n = 0; n < x; n++)
{
    temp[n] = orig[n];
}

//delete orig array
for(int n = 0; n < x; n++)
{
    delete orig[n];
}
delete[] orig;

//store temp into orig
orig = temp;

However, when I try to access the element for example:

cout << orig[0]->getName();

I get a bad memeory alloc error:

Unhandled exception at at 0x768F4B32 in file.exe: Microsoft C++ exception: std::bad_alloc at memory location 0x0033E598.
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If you provided a minimal implementation of Animal so your code snippet could be compiled and run, it would be easier to track down the problem. Given that you're using C++, why on earth do you want to avoid std::vector? –  Rook Nov 21 '12 at 18:50
    
Because people who only start using C++ are afraid of the Standard Library, that's why! STL is big, and scary, and unintelligible, and you not sure if it will behave the way you expect. So people start doing things on their own. –  Joker_vD Nov 21 '12 at 18:53
1  
@Joker_vD That's really a bad argument (but I suspect that you know it). std::vector should be learned well before new, or even C style arrays, since it is significantly easier to use than either. (And he's doing an array new. While learn something that has no practical use?) –  James Kanze Nov 21 '12 at 18:55
    
Surely you should learn how to use STL before learning pointer stuff, but that's not how C++ courses are organized. And when you know about pointers and arrays, the first meeting with STL indeed makes you uneasy — because you try to imagine how it'll actually do its work with pointers and arrays, and you get confused, and just think, "Heck no, I'll do it on my own, I don't need any std:: stuff". What I tell you is based on my talks with my buddies at the university who took the same programming courses. –  Joker_vD Nov 21 '12 at 19:01
    
Seconded @JamesKanze. Consider "Accellerated C++" as an example text that does a good job of focusing on Standard Library components before getting all nitty gritty. –  John Dibling Nov 21 '12 at 19:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
//delete orig array
for(int n = 0; n < x; n++)
{
    delete orig[n];
}

For this particular case, don't do this. You are actually deleting the objects not the array. So all the objects in the temp array are pointing to invalid locations. Simply do delete [] orig to deallocate the original array.

share|improve this answer

You are copying wrong. Instead of copying your temp array is simply pointing to the same location as that of the orig. Now when you delete the orig the temp pointers point to an invalid location.

//save to temp
for(int n = 0; n < x; n++)
{
    //temp[n] = orig[n];
    // Try this instead
    strcpy(temp[n], orig[n]);
}
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