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I have a dictionary with the following data:

Key    Value
1      Introduction
1.1    General
1.1.1  Scope
1.2    Expectations
2      Background
2.1    Early Development
...

What I'd like to do is figure out a way - in C# - to create a new list (or append to an array) with the values concatenated based on the list-style key, like so:

Key    Value              Concatenation
1      Introduction       Introduction
1.1    General            Introduction - General
1.1.1  Scope              Indroduction - General - Scope
1.2    Expectations       Introduction - Expectations
2      Background         Background
2.1    Early Development  Background - Early Development
...

There is no set number of sublevels for the key but it will always be in numeric format. Any thoughts?

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2  
You're probably going to need to convert it from a "flat" data structure to a tree based data structure; once they're in a tree based hierarchical view it would be pretty easy. –  Servy Nov 21 '12 at 19:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This obviously needs to be cleaned up and made more efficient, but you can do this pretty simply using a recursive method:

static string GetConcatenationRecursively(Dictionary<string, string> d, string key)
{
    if (key.Length == 1)
    {
        return d[key];
    }
    else
    {
        return string.Format(
            "{0} - {1}",
            GetConcatenationRecursively(d, key.Substring(0, key.LastIndexOf('.'))),
            d[key]);
    }
}

This would be called like this:

Dictionary<string, string> d = new Dictionary<string, string>();
d.Add("1", "Introduction");
d.Add("1.1", "General");
d.Add("1.1.1", "Scope");
d.Add("1.2", "Expectations");
d.Add("2", "Background");
d.Add("2.1", "Early Development");

List<Tuple<string, string, string>> list = new List<Tuple<string, string, string>>();
foreach (string key in d.Keys)
{
    list.Add(new Tuple<string, string, string>(key, d[key], GetConcatenationRecursively(d, key)));
}

Needs lots of error handling as well; this obviously assumes a well-formed input. But you should be able to take it from here.

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This is perfect, thanks a ton! –  bozworth Nov 26 '12 at 13:51
    
Sorry, I marked this post as answered prematurely. The method above works great but I do, on occasion, have keys with numbers that are in the double digits. I should have mentioned that in my original question. How do I tweak this to allow for that? Thanks –  bozworth Nov 26 '12 at 15:04
    
Good point. Edited post to switch out key.Length - 2 for key.LastIndexOf('.'); that should do the trick. –  zimdanen Nov 26 '12 at 15:56
1  
You rock, thanks! –  bozworth Nov 26 '12 at 21:10

This solution may not be the most pretty one you could come up with, but if you know that your requirements are really that simple, you might not want to over-engieer it and just go ahead with something straight forward like this approach - please note that most of the code is just boilerplate to render the " - " part correctly; the actual algorithm part is not much code:

var dic = new Dictionary<string, string>();
      dic.Add("1", "Introduction");
      dic.Add("1.1", "General");
      dic.Add("1.1.1", "Scope");
      dic.Add("1.2", "Expectations");
      dic.Add("2", "Background");
      dic.Add("2.1", "Early Development");

      foreach (var kvp in dic)
      {
        string item = String.Empty;

        int length = kvp.Key.Length - 2;
        while (length > 0)
        {
          var parent = dic[kvp.Key.Substring(0, length)];
          if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(item))
            item = String.Format("{0} - {1}", parent, item);
          else
            item = parent;
          length -= 2;
        }
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(item))
          item = String.Format("{0} - {1}", item, kvp.Value);
        else
          item = kvp.Value;
        Console.WriteLine(item);
      }
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I believe you assume that the items will be processed in the order they're listed in. That's...not the case. Dictionary collections are unordered. You'll need to either put them in a List instead, or sort them before iterating (possibly sort by string length of key, that should work). –  Servy Nov 21 '12 at 19:25
    
Hi - thanks for pointing out, I should have mentioned that. My guess was that sorting would be the least part of the problem :-) And of cause the code needs refactoring to be more expressive; my main point was that if the requirement is really this simple, it can be solved in very few lines of code. If the requirement is more complex, I think it is worth playing around with something more complex like the direction you are suggesting in your comment to the OP's question :) –  Maate Nov 21 '12 at 19:38
    
Also note that this works great as long as the values are single digits. For example, 1.10.1, won't work. As you said, simple requirements. –  Michael Sallmen Nov 21 '12 at 19:44

If you just need to output the display, use something like Maate's answer. If you need this in a collection, the below is a start (but it only goes one level up):

Dictionary<string, string> d = new Dictionary<string, string>();
d.Add("1", "Introduction");
d.Add("1.1", "General");
d.Add("1.1.1", "Scope");
d.Add("1.2", "Expectations");
d.Add("2", "Background");
d.Add("2.1", "Early Development");

var links = from key in d.Keys
            from subKey in d.Keys
            where subKey.StartsWith(key) && (subKey.Length == key.Length + 2)
            select new
            {
                Key = key,
                SubKey = subKey
            };

var a = from key in d.Keys
        join link in links on key equals link.SubKey into lj
        from sublink in lj.DefaultIfEmpty()
        select new
        {
            Key = key,
            Value = d[key],
            Concatenation = (sublink == null ? string.Empty : d[sublink.Key] + " - ") + d[key]
        };

It gets the links and then uses a left join from the dictionary to the links to get the Concatenation. Like I said, it only goes one level up, so this isn't a complete solution. Needs infinite recursion.

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Put a delimiter in the string that you can split it apart with, commonly a semi-colon (;). But you can use more.

If you use a semi-colon, make sure to strip them out of your strings.

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