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So I've been working on an algorithm. The task I'm trying to accomplish is: consider a 2D plane there are targets that are randomly distributed between a y upper bound and lower bound. This set is T. T1 is marked with coordinates(X,Y). There is a set S of sensors that are guaranteed to cover every target each sensor has a radius 1 and an (X,Y) coordinate. Each target has a cost (c) that is a weight. So my task is to find a minimum weight or cost for a set S' that covers each sensor.

So I know that there is a recursive relation between the disks that "dominate" or "control" other disks but I'm having trouble seeing a property that shows how to utilize the dominance of the disks. I got this far:

Let D+ be the set of disks whose centre lies above the strip (upper disks).

Let D- be the set of disks whose centre lies below the strip (lower disks).

Consider an upper disk d, and d intersects a vertical line L. Another upper disk d' is said to be controlled or dominated by d, if one of the following holds: (1)d' does not intersect L (2)the lower intersection endpoint of d' and L is higher than the lower intersection endpoint of d and L (3)the lower intersection endpoint of d' and L is identical to the lower intersection endpoint of d and L, but the centre of d' is on the right of the centre of d.

Similarly, for a lower disk d, and d intersects a vertical line L. Another lower disk d' is said to be controlled or dominated by d, if one of the following holds: (1)d' does not intersect L (2)the upper intersection endpoint of d' and L is lower than the upper intersection endpoint of d and L (3)the upper intersection endpoint of d' and L is identical to the upper intersection endpoint of d and L, but the centre of d' is on the right of the centre of d. Example:three sensors with radius 1

But I’m having trouble finalizing the algorithm. any help? Is that clear?

Thanks, Christopher

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Hi Christopher, thanks for your question. I think you might find a more helpful answer from the theoretical CS Stack Exchange crowd cstheory.stackexchange.com or even the new CS beta cs.stackexchange.com Good luck with your problem. – Diederik Nov 21 '12 at 19:43
    
@Chris: Can you check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/13518402/… it seems like a stripped down version of this problem. May be the answers would be of some help. Cheers! – Asiri Rathnayake Nov 22 '12 at 20:17
    
It's pretty much the same problem. It seems derived. But nobody seems to be able to think of a more dynamic way to solve it. – Chris Topher Nov 23 '12 at 17:43
    
So what I've tried is to create sets for each sensor listing targets S1{t1,t2} S2{t2,t3} etc. but I can not find a way to do this and select the minimum cost in polynomial time recursively – Chris Topher Nov 23 '12 at 17:45
    
This is looking like it might be related to the Steiner tree problem, which is NP-hard. I'm not sure, though. – templatetypedef Dec 29 '12 at 2:41

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