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Here where my css menu is: My css menu

Notice if you hover over "about us" like below you see the "our clergy" sub menu already out. I don't want that I want it when you hover over "our clergy" for it to show.

enter image description here

This screenshot above is from firefox, while webkit browsers show a 1-2px difference as seen below and I can't figure out why? It sometimes effects how the menu works too.

enter image description here

Here is my css for the menu (I'm using wordpress so that means there is no html):

Feel free to help me out and if you want to clean up the css you can too!

#navbar {
height: 40px;
padding-left: 10px;
margin-left:-10px;
margin-top: -29px;
margin-bottom:0;
background: #F4DE9F;
width:930px;
/*backgroundborder-top: 2px solid #F4DE9F;
border-bottom: 2px solid #F4DE9F;*/
}

#navbar li {
float: left;
list-style: none;
margin-bottom: 30px;
margin-left:-20px;
}
#navbar li a {
font-family: "MuseoSans_500";
color: #3C290B;
font-weight: 500;
text-transform: uppercase;
}
#navbar li:hover {
background:rgba(255, 241, 194, 100); /*#FFF1C2;*/
color: #645548;
text-decoration: none;
}
#navbar li a:hover {
background:rgba(255, 241, 194, 100); /*#FFF1C2;*/
color: #645548;
text-decoration: none;
}
#navbar .parent > a, #navbar .parent > a:hover {
background: #F4DE9F;
background-position: right;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
}
#navbar ul, #navbar ul li {
display: inline;
list-style: none;
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
}
#navbar ul li a {
display: inline-block;
padding: 11px 16.2px 8px;
text-decoration: none;
}

/*
#navbar ul li a:hover {
}
#navbar ul #first a:hover {
}*/

#navbar ul li {
position: relative;
}
#navbar li ul {
display: none;
left: 11px;
position: absolute;
top: 51px;
}
#navbar li ul a {
background: #F4DE9F;
}
#navbar ul ul ul li {
}
#navbar ul li:hover ul {
display: inline-block;
}
#navbar ul li:hover ul, #navbar ul ul li:hover ul, #navbar ul ul ul li:hover ul {
display: block;
margin: -11px 0 0 -11px;
}
/*#navbar ul li:hover ul li a, #navbar ul ul li:hover ul li a, #navbar ul ul ul li:hover ul li a {
display: block;
}*/
#navbar ul li:hover ul ul, #navbar ul ul li:hover ul ul {
margin-top: -50px;
margin-left:129px;
}

#navbar ul li:hover ul li a {
padding: 10px 14px 8px;
width: 112px;
}

#navbar ul li:hover ul ul li a {
padding: 10px 14px 8px;
width: 112px;
}
/*#navbar ul ul ul li:hover ul li a {
padding: 0 16px 0 24px;
width: 140px;
}*/
#navbar .children li a:hover {
color: #000;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by tereško, toscho, Brian Clozel, dystroy, CJM Dec 1 '12 at 15:45

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
forgive me but what does "I'm using wordpress so that means there is no html" mean? –  Jawad Nov 21 '12 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you end up with a stylesheet that feels very bloated with several rules and a lot of specificity, such as #navbar ul ul ul li:hover ul it is usually good to take a step back see if you can simplify the rules a bit.

Since you are using Wordpress it comes with a lot of handy classes that makes the job easier. In this case .menu-item and .sub-menu.

Replacing the menu-css with the following styles solves the problems you mentioned in your question, tried in Chrome 23, Safari 6 and Firefox 16.

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/5qEwH/

.menu-item {
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
    font-family: "MuseoSans_500";
    font-weight: 500;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    background: #F4DE9F;
}

.menu-item:hover {
    background: #FFF1C2;
}

.menu-item a {
    display: inline-block;
    height: 20px;
    padding: 10px;
    text-decoration: none;
    color: #645548;
}
/* Hide submenus by default */
.sub-menu {
    display: none;
    position: absolute;
    width: 150px;
    top: 40px;
}

.sub-menu .menu-item {
    width: 100%;
}
/* The second level sub-menu should be moved to the right */
.sub-menu .menu-item > .sub-menu {
    top: 0;
    left: 150px;
}

/* Show submenus on hover */
.menu-item:hover > .sub-menu {
    display: block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
My menus now don't position right under the title like in yours and I just copied and pasted the code, so I when back to what I had before –  benlevywebdesign Nov 22 '12 at 4:59
    
Make sure you removed all the styles that targets the menu-elements. It sounds like some old style with higher priority is overwriting the positioning. What code did you copy? The snippet here or the full CSS from the fiddle? Can you upload the new code? –  johnnygoy Nov 22 '12 at 6:50
    
i copied the snippet from here and from the fiddle, but Ill try coping the whole fiddle css –  benlevywebdesign Nov 22 '12 at 15:22

Its a great CSS practice to normalize your styles first so that all the browsers get the same styles for some basic HTML elements.

I add this at the start of a Stylesheet

* { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; text-decoration: none }

There is also a comprehensive stylesheet file for normalization that covers all the browsers and even html5 as well. try to add this before your style.css file.

Here is the link: http://necolas.github.com/normalize.css/

For the hover issue, try this css change

Replace

 #navbar ul li:hover ul {
     display: inline-block;
}

    #navbar ul li:hover ul, #navbar ul ul li:hover ul, #navbar ul ul ul li:hover ul {
        display: block;
        margin: -11px 0 0 -11px;
    }

With

#navbar ul li:hover > ul {
     display: inline-block;
}
#navbar ul li:hover > ul, #navbar ul ul li:hover > ul, #navbar ul ul ul li:hover > ul {
    display: block;
    margin: -11px 0 0 -11px;
}

Hope it helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
That's a great tip! What about the other part of my question, the part about the hovers? –  benlevywebdesign Nov 21 '12 at 20:03
    
For the hover issue, you have to use first child identifier. You have to target the first UL element and not go in depth. #navbar li ul should be #navbar li > ul –  Abdul Haseeb Nov 21 '12 at 20:18
    
So changing it to that should work, and change it on all of them that are the current way? –  benlevywebdesign Nov 21 '12 at 20:21
    
updated the answer with what i am suggesting. –  Abdul Haseeb Nov 21 '12 at 20:27
    
Updated my response –  benlevywebdesign Nov 21 '12 at 20:29

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