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I need to write the C-code that does

DDRB &= ~pins;

with inline assembly (AVR). I never used it before. My attempt:

register uint8_t t1, t2; // temporary registers
__asm__ volatile (
    "in %[t1], %[w1_ddr]"   "\n\t"
    "mov %[t2], %[pins]"    "\n\t"
    "com %[t2]"             "\n\t"
    "and %[t1], %[t2]"      "\n\t"
    "out %[w1_ddr], %[t1]"  "\n\t"
    : [t1] "+r" (t1),
      [t2] "+r" (t2),
      [w1_ddr] "+I" (_SFR_IO_ADDR(DDRB))
    : [pins] "r" (pins)
);  

gcc gives the following error lvalue required in asm statement. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to write it in assembler? What's wrong with DDRB &= ~pins;? – Keith Thompson Nov 21 '12 at 20:51
    
@Keith: I use it in time-critical code and I should be sure about number of clock cycles that command spend. With C I can't be sure about it. – Corvus Nov 22 '12 at 2:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The "I" constraint in AVR indicates that the operand is a constant. Hence it cannot be "+", i.e. input-output. Make it plain input, like this:

register uint8_t t1, t2; // temporary registers
__asm__ volatile (
    "in %[t1], %[w1_ddr]"   "\n\t"
    "mov %[t2], %[pins]"    "\n\t"
    "com %[t2]"             "\n\t"
    "and %[t1], %[t2]"      "\n\t"
    "out %[w1_ddr], %[t1]"  "\n\t"
    : [t1] "+r" (t1),
      [t2] "+r" (t2)
    : [w1_ddr] "I" (_SFR_IO_ADDR(DDRB)),
      [pins] "r" (pins)
); 
share|improve this answer
    
But I write to w1_ddr at last line. I should to say that w1_ddr is both input and output, isn't it? – Corvus Nov 22 '12 at 1:56
    
Oh, sorry, I'm a idiot. w1_ddr is a constant really. I can't delete previous comment. – Corvus Nov 22 '12 at 2:29

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