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Name   Age     Work    Eyes
---------------------------
John   young  home   black

Mike  young   home   blue

Irvin   old   home   black

Marie  young  home   blue

Teddy  old   factory  green

Multiple checkbox form, search term1=young, term2=home, term3=blue

 SELECT   Name 
 FROM     my_table 
 WHERE    (Age = 'young')
       OR (Work = 'home')
       OR (Eyes = 'blue') 
 ORDER BY (Age = 'young')
        + (Work = 'home')
        + (Eyes = 'blue') DESC LIMIT 1

In my case two results are with maximum-equal coincidences (Mike and Marie) I want to show both of them.
How to LIMIT for most frequently results? Could be only one or many: 2,3...equal coincidences
off:thanks eggyal for ordering

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't think there is a solution without scanning the whole table (twice). Here's one:

SELECT t.Name
FROM 
    my_table AS t
  JOIN
    ( SELECT MAX((Age = 'young') + (Work = 'home') + (Eyes = 'blue')) AS matching
      FROM my_table
    ) AS m
    ON  m.matching > 0  
    AND m.matching = (t.Age = 'young') + (t.Work = 'home') + (t.Eyes = 'blue')
 ;
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works perfect, thanks –  Telu Nov 25 '12 at 13:52

A subquery can be a simple way of doing this sort of thing. What you're really looking for is all entries where the value of (Age = 'young') + (Work = 'home') + (Eyes = 'blue') equals the highest value across all entries.

SELECT Name
FROM my_table
WHERE
    Age = 'young'
    OR Work = 'home'
    OR Eyes = 'blue'
    AND ( (Age = 'young') + (Work = 'home') + (Eyes = 'blue') ) = (
            SELECT MAX((Age = 'young') + (Work = 'home') + (Eyes = 'blue'))
            FROM my_table
        )
share|improve this answer
    
Is not exactly what I want. In table above for those 3 search terms I want to have only 2 search results (Mike and Marie). In another case on next search for ex. "young", "factory","green" the search result must be only one:"Teddy"; in another case with "young", "home". "green" must be only 3 rows: Jonh, Mike, Marie. Thanks and sorry for my english –  Telu Nov 22 '12 at 11:36
    
i think this answer is correct, only the parentheses are wrong (Age = 'young' OR Work = 'home' OR Eyes = 'blue') AND (...) will work –  fthiella Nov 25 '12 at 9:07

If you want to get results based on similarities, the following will give you a result but I had to write all the combinations so in real case scenario you will need to have n! + 1* conditions.

n! stands for "factorial" and for example 3! means 3 * 2 * 1 = 6
and +1 is for the whole match (3 in your case)

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    1 AS '_Age',1 AS '_Work',1 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Age`,`Work`,`Eyes`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    1 AS '_Age',1 AS '_Work',0 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Age`,`Work`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    1 AS '_Age',0 AS '_Work',1 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Age`,`Eyes`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    0 AS '_Age',1 AS '_Work',1 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Work`,`Eyes`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    1 AS '_Age',0 AS '_Work',0 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Age`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    0 AS '_Age',1 AS '_Work',0 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Work`
HAVING `matches` > 1

UNION

SELECT
    GROUP_CONCAT(`Name` SEPARATOR ' - ') AS 'Names',
    COUNT(*) AS 'matches',
    0 AS '_Age',0 AS '_Work',1 AS '_Eyes'
FROM `my_table` WHERE
    `Age`='young' OR
    `Work`='home' OR
    `Eyes`='blue'
GROUP BY `Eyes`
HAVING `matches` > 1

ORDER BY
    `_Age`+`_Work`+`_Eyes` DESC,
    `matches` DESC

And the result will be

|            Names            | matches | _Age | _Work | _Eyes |
+-----------------------------+---------+------+-------+-------+
| Mike - Marie                |    2    |   1  |   1   |   1   |
| John - Mike - Marie         |    3    |   1  |   1   |   0   |
| Mike - Marie                |    2    |   1  |   0   |   1   |
| John - Irvin                |    2    |   0  |   1   |   1   |
| Mike - Marie                |    2    |   0  |   1   |   1   |
| John - Mike - Irvin - Marie |    4    |   0  |   1   |   0   |
| John - Mike - Marie         |    3    |   1  |   0   |   0   |
| Mike - Marie                |    2    |   0  |   0   |   1   |
| John - Irvin                |    2    |   0  |   0   |   1   |

This is not extremely practical but I don't know how you can get name combinations by any other approach.

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