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While passing arguments to a function, how to group parameters into a single argument? example

if my script file "my_script.sh" has a function like

    echo_arguments() {
    echo $1
    } 
    echo_arguments $1

Now in unix command line, How to specify parameters as a single arguments?

    ./my_spcript.sh a b c d        #these "a b c d" must fit in $1
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can group several words into a single parameter in several ways:

./my_spcript.sh 'a b c d'
./my_spcript.sh "a b c d"
./my_spcript.sh a\ b\ c\ d

Basically, they all come down to telling the shell to treat the spaces as part of a parameter, rather than separators between parameters. All of the above run the script with $1 set to a b c d, and $2, $3, etc unset.

However, when you expand $1 without quotes, like this:

echo_arguments $1

The shell expands $1 and then resplits it treating the spaces as separators between parameters. So while my_spcript.sh gets a b c d as a single parameter, echo_arguments gets each letter as a separate parameter. Usually, the best way to fix this is to put $1 in double-quotes to keep it from being re-split (and prevent some other probably undesirable stray parsing as well):

echo_arguments "$1"

As a general rule, whenever you substitute a variable, you should wrap it in double-quotes to prevent the sort of problem you're seeing. There are cases when you want the additional parsing, so you don't want the double-quotes; but unless you have a specific reason for wanting the shell to do the extra parsing, use double-quotes to save headaches.

For your specific example, another way to "fix" this would be to make echo_arguments echo all of its arguments, not just the first:

echo_arguments() {
    echo "$@"
} 

Note that "$@" expands to all of the current script/function's arguments, each one treated as a separate argument to the command/function they're being passed to (essentially, they're passed through intact).

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Surrounding the argument with quotes will allow spaces in the argument - i.e. ./my_spcript.sh 'a b c d'. You'll need to do the same again inside your script:

# my_script.sh
echo_arguments() {
    echo $1
}
echo_arguments "$1"

As mentioned by others, $@ (and $*) provide other ways to refer to all of the command line arguments as a group. See http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/internalvariables.html for details in Bash, for example.

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i tried this like ./my_script.sh echo hi and my output was just 'echo' in $1 –  Nathan Pk Nov 21 '12 at 20:25
    
@NathanPk In that example, you didn't use quotes. He told you to add quotes around your arguments when calling the script. –  Brian Campbell Nov 21 '12 at 20:28
    
sorry its a typo error. I used quotes for my above example –  Nathan Pk Nov 21 '12 at 21:00
    
I just corrected the shortcoming in my original answer. Hope that helps. :) –  Mark A. Fitzgerald Nov 21 '12 at 21:38

I don't know if it fits, but you can try to employ "var args" in bash:

echo_arguments() {
 echo ${@:1:4}
}

echo_arguments ${@:1:4}

This will expand the first 4 parameters.

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If you want these to be a single argument in the script, then pass them in in quotes (single or double):

./my_script.sh 'a b c d'

If, instead, you want them to be parsed as separate arguments, but you want to pass all of the arguments to your script to the function within it, you can use $@ to refer to all of them at once.

echo_arguments() {
    echo "$@"
} 
echo_arguments "$@"
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