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I have this code (sass):

.orange-button{
  padding: 6px;
  @include gradient-background(bottom, $or1, #fbb752); 
  @include border-radius(5px, 5px, 5px, 5px);
  border: 1px solid #d27d00;
  font-family: “Myriad Pro”, Arial, Helvetica, Tahoma, sans-serif;
  font-weight: bold;
  font-size: 16px;
  color: $or3;
  text-align: center;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, .70);
  font-style: normal
}

As you can see I have an orange gradient background for my buttons. But I want to put one more transparent background on my orange, so that button is orange with a transparent "carbon" style. How can I do this?

If I write:

.orange-button{
  padding: 6px;
  @include gradient-background(bottom, $or1, #fbb752); 
  @include border-radius(5px, 5px, 5px, 5px);
  background: transparent url('button-carbon-bg.png') no-repeat;
  border: 1px solid #d27d00;
  font-family: “Myriad Pro”, Arial, Helvetica, Tahoma, sans-serif;
  font-weight: bold;
  font-size: 16px;
  color: $or3;
  text-align: center;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, .70);
  font-style: normal
}

I can get only a transparent carbon background, but I want both orange and carbon.

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1  
First of all, your gradient background isn't supported in all browsers, you need to specify it for each browser, second of all use images, i doubt that this is possible, and it would help if you could set up fiddle –  Linas Nov 21 '12 at 21:00
    
@Linas i didn;t want to create images for all width heights i have... Also if you read: this is sass... In other mixin i have this part for all browser's... –  PavelBY Nov 21 '12 at 21:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll have to edit the mixin/make your own to support multiple backgrounds. Here is a simple tweak of what yours might look like:

@mixin gradient-background-with-img( $dir,$from, $to, $img) {
  background: #{$img}, -webkit-linear-gradient(to $dir, $from, $to);
  background: #{$img}, -moz-linear-gradient(to $dir, $from, $to);
  background: #{$img}, -ms-linear-gradient(to $dir, $from, $to);
  background: #{$img}, -o-linear-gradient(to $dir, $from, $to);
  background: #{$img}, linear-gradient(to $dir, $from, $to);
}

then you can use it like:

div {
 @include gradient-background-with-img(bottom,$or1,#fbb752,'url(image.png) no-repeat left top'); 
}
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You might want to consider using Compass. It has a mixin that will do that for you (that supports up to 10 images/gradients):

http://compass-style.org/reference/compass/css3/images/

Sass:

#linear-gradient {
    @include background(linear-gradient(left top, white, #dddddd), url('some-image.png'));
}

Generated CSS:

#linear-gradient {
  background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 100% 100%, color-stop(0%, #ffffff), color-stop(100%, #dddddd)), url("some-image.png");
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left top, #ffffff, #dddddd), url("some-image.png");
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(left top, #ffffff, #dddddd), url("some-image.png");
  background: -o-linear-gradient(left top, #ffffff, #dddddd), url("some-image.png");
  background: linear-gradient(left top, #ffffff, #dddddd), url("some-image.png");
}
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I'm not sure if there's a SASS shortcut for this, but multiple backgrounds have to be specified in the same background: property, separated by commas. Writing two separate properties causes the latter one to overwrite the previous one.

For example:

background: url('button-carbon-bg.png') no-repeat, url('another-image.png') no-repeat;

Also note that they are rendered in order of specification, the first one as the highest layer.

share|improve this answer
    
yes is good.... but for sass also i will need to write it to all browsers, or to do new mixin –  PavelBY Nov 21 '12 at 21:07

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