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I am profiling the garbage behavior of java.lang.String and it looks like each time you instantiate a string for the first time inside any class it always generate garbage. Would anyone know why?

public abstract class AbstractTest {

    protected static String SERGIO = "sergio";

    private String someValue;

    public void init() {
        this.someValue = new String(SERGIO);
    }
}

public class Test extends AbstractTest {

    private static String JULIA = "julia";

    private Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
    private String anotherValue;
    private String yetAnother;

    private void gc() throws InterruptedException {
        System.gc();
        Thread.sleep(100);
    }

    private long usedMemory() {
        return runtime.maxMemory() - runtime.freeMemory();
    }

    public void test() throws Exception {
        gc();
        this.anotherValue = new String(SERGIO); // a bunch of garbage is created!
        long usedMemory = usedMemory();
        gc();
        long usedMemoryAfterGC = usedMemory();
        System.out.println("Collected: " + (usedMemory - usedMemoryAfterGC));
        gc();
        this.yetAnother = new String(JULIA); // no more garbage
        usedMemory = usedMemory();
        gc();
        usedMemoryAfterGC = usedMemory();
        System.out.println("Collected: " + (usedMemory - usedMemoryAfterGC));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Test t = new Test();
        t.test();
    }

Output:

Collected: 704336
Collected: 0

That 's fine. First time it creates garbage, then subsequent instantiations produce no garbage.

What is weird is when you force a string creation in the superclass, it still creates garbage in the subclass the first time you instantiate a String there:

public void test() throws Exception {
    gc();
    init(); // creates a String in the superclass
    gc();
    this.yetAnother = new String(JULIA);
    long usedMemory = usedMemory();
    gc();
    long usedMemoryAfterGC = usedMemory();
    System.out.println("Collected: " + (usedMemory - usedMemoryAfterGC));
}

Output:

Collected: 348648

Any idea why?

(By the way I am running this on MAC and JDK 1.6.0_37)

EDIT1: I changed the code slightly to make it clear that string internalization is not the culprit here, at least it does not look like it is.

EDIT2: If you change String to Object throughout the code, you get the same garbage so I guess it has to do with how object allocation through new happens in Java. The first time you allocate an object in a class you get the garbage. The second time you don't. Weird it is per class.

EDIT3: I wrote a blog article where I talk about how to force a GC to profile your applications for garbage creation, like I am doing in the code above.

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2  
It might be worth noting that calling System.gc(); does not guarantee that the garbage collector will run immediately. Its kind of like a "hey, when you get a chance, it would be nice if you'd run" –  user489041 Nov 21 '12 at 21:06
    
Don't understand what you mean with "garbage" - what did you expect? –  Andy Nov 21 '12 at 21:06
    
garbage = de-referenced objects in the heap that will be eventually collected by the gc. If you noticed, I am not the one producing the garbage but the JVM is doing that under the hood. The JDK classes often do that, but this time it looks kind of weird. –  TraderJoeChicago Nov 21 '12 at 21:11
    
@user489041 He is sleeping after the System.gc() so there is a good chance that the GC will run. And it looks like it is because stuff is getting collected... Could it be that the freeMemory() is just broken somehow? –  chrisapotek Nov 21 '12 at 21:13
2  
@TomaszNurkiewicz:That would cause it to be pooled.So it matters regarding performance.But I don't think that this is the issue in this question –  Cratylus Nov 21 '12 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

A literal String inside a class will be "interned" on first reference (if not before). Interning will generally involve discarding the original version of the String and using the interned version, and a few more objects may be created and discarded in the process.

(And, of course, there's really no reliable way to detect how much garbage is being generated in any single operation, without special internal hooks, so your measurements are suspect at best.)

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2  
There is no intern in the code in the OP –  Cratylus Nov 21 '12 at 21:20
    
I don't think that's the issue here. "interned" means added to the internal pool. I added String s1 = "sergio"; String s2 = "julia"; before the instantiation and it had no effect in the output. The strings I am creating with new I am not internalizing on purpose because I want a new object in the heap. –  TraderJoeChicago Nov 21 '12 at 21:26
1  
@Cratylus -- There most definitely is an intern. According to the JVM spec, every statically-defined (literal) string in a class must be interned before it can be used. And, in the case of a static final string "inherited" from the parent class, the value is treated as a literal in the child class -- the value in the parent class is not referenced after compilation. If you do a javap on the child class you will see those strings in the literal pool. –  Hot Licks Nov 21 '12 at 22:35
    
@HotLicks I am not doing any internalization myself in the lines I am measuring as you can see in my code. However I don't know if new String(...) is doing any internalization internally. The garbage created seems excessive for internalized strings. Are you also saying that the string pool is not global? What does an internalized string literal has to do with the class it is in? A string literal "foo" on class A is the same object of string literal "foo" on class B, coming from the same string pool. No? –  TraderJoeChicago Nov 21 '12 at 22:58
    
It's not new String that does this, it's reference to a string literal such as "julia". The first time such a literal is referenced it must be interned. (Interning is, in a way, the process for creating a "global" pool of string constants from the individual string literals in each class. This is why the literal "foo" will have the same address wherever you reference it.) –  Hot Licks Nov 21 '12 at 23:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

After reading Peter's answer here it is clear that TLAB is the culprit. If you use the option -XX:-UseTLAB to disable TLAB the problem goes away. From what I understood from here, it looks like with TLAB a thread allocates a big chunk of memory initially to avoid race conditions later. I was able to prove that TLAB was the culprit by setting a bigger size for it with the -XX:TLABSize=64m and see this amount being allocated.

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