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I'm using a nagios check called 'check_logfiles' to parse out syslog on a bunch of solaris machines. It's entirely written in Perl and takes a config file that also uses Perl syntax. I am trying to exclude the following line from the output of the check using regex:

Nov 16 19:15:04 db07  Cluster.CCR: [ID 574345 daemon.debug] server address: 127.0.0.1

This is the regex that I'm attempting to use (unsuccessfully)

'^.*?(Cluster.CCR).*?$'

This is the entire config file for the check in case you might like some context:

$options = 'report=long';
@searches = (
{
tag => 'syslog',
logfile => '/var/adm/messages',
rotation => 'SOLARIS',
options => 'noprotocol',
sticky  => 2400,
criticalpatterns => [
   'daemon.debug',
   'daemon.error',
   'Could not send report: Broken pipe',
   'Could not retrieve catalog from remote server: Error 400 on SERVER'
],
warningpatterns => [
    'daemon.warning',
    'daemon.info',
    'daemon.notice',
    'kern',
],
criticalexceptions => [
 'connect from nagioszone01.mydomain.com',
 'from 10.20.28.140',
 'Finished catalog run in',
 'Did not receive identification string from',
 '^.*?(Cluster.CCR).*?$'
],
 warningexceptions => [
 'connect from nagioszone01.mydomain.com',
 'from 10.20.28.140',
 'Finished catalog run in',
 'Did not receive identification string from',
 'Cluster.CCR'
],
 options => 'logfilenocry,sticky=900',
});

Thanks for any advice you may have to share

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You may need to escape the period before CCR in the regex, like: Cluster\.CCR. –  jcern Nov 21 '12 at 22:09
    
No need to anchor the regex at start and end if you only care about the middle. '(Cluster\.CCR)' will do fine. However, it depends on how you use it. –  TLP Nov 21 '12 at 22:09
    
@jcern That would make the regex stricter, it doesn't explain why it fails. –  TLP Nov 21 '12 at 22:09
    
@TLP, true. I mentioned it as an FYI since it seemed like it was trying to match a literal .. That said his regex worked for me when tested against the string in a test. I would assume there may be some strange line ending weirdness. That said, your suggestion should work. –  jcern Nov 21 '12 at 22:17
1  
I noticed you've surrounded the regex with single quotes. That's a bit odd. Could you show the code where you're using this regex? –  Schwern Nov 21 '12 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

I don't know if you got it solved, but I recommend using WOTS for the task. I maintain and expanded the original WOTS and use it exactly for these kind of setups. It is a perl daemon with integrated nsca client if you want to send passive alerts to nagios. Plenty of examples are included. For WOTS: http://www.e-dynamics.be/?section=programs

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Regex doesnt serve any possibilty to exclude "Words" - so you need to use a workarround

Imagine You want to Match "EVERYTHING" inside a div but not, if theres the word "Flower" in it (You dont like Flowers, so you dont want to match that.)

Match everything between the div-tags:

/<div>([^<]+?)<\/div>/

Not a Masterpiece.

We "can't" exclude words - but we can exclude a char followed by a phrase. So we exclude any char followed by "lower":

/<div>([^<](?!lower))+?)<\/div>/

This doesnt match a text with other words ("Glower" "Alower") too...

So we need to "modify" our "lookahead" with another "lookbehind":

/<div>((?:[^<](?!(?<=F)lower))+?)<\/div>/

In your case, you can use ^ and $ instead of the div tags and pick some random word that should NOT be inside the matched value.

<div>((?:[^<](?!(?<=F)lower))+?)<\/div>

Regular expression visualization

Debuggex Demo

(But how ever, if you want to exclude whole lines - why using a regex?)

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You are correct. Regexes don't exclude words. I should explain further that I am using a nagios check, written in perl, that takes a configuration file. All that check does is parse the contents of log files. The configuration file is in perl syntax (shown above). Anything that I pop into the criticalexceptions => array will be excluded from the log search. It can use regexes which are helpful in this case because the lines in the logs have similar entries but some elements do change. In the line shown above, only the numeric element of [ID 574345 daemon.debug] will change. –  bluethundr Nov 23 '12 at 13:11
    
Can downvoters please explain? I added a Debuggex Demo, it works. Is the down vote, cause its not another "Copy&Paste" Solution? –  dognose Oct 18 '13 at 10:50

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