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I have a hash with an arbitrary key:

{'GET': [1,2,3]}

or

{'POST': ['my data 0', 'my data 1']}

The hash is generated from JSON which is sent in the request body. There is just one key, or rather, I ignore any keys but one.

I want to find which key it is, and this is the code that I wrote:

items = data['GET'] || data['get'] || data['POST'] || data['post']

this does not look neat. If the number of keys that I want to process grows the expression will be long. I want it to be short. I am new to Ruby, is there a better way?

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The hash should be created differently for convenience. {method: 'POST', data: [1,2,3]} – Mark Thomas Nov 21 '12 at 22:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you think it might grow, you may want to separate the HTTP methods from the finding of that method in the data:

methods = [:get, :post]

def find_method(data)
  keys = methods.map{|m| [m.to_s.upcase, m.to_s]}.flatten
  data.values_at(keys).first
end
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You could just get the first value (assuming there's only one) like this:

item = data.values.first
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thanks. I need to know the key name to dispatch my items to the right method. – akonsu Nov 21 '12 at 22:12
    
You can use the .keys and .values methods to get the name of the first key and the value... I'm a bit confused about what you're asking though. – hmbl9r Nov 21 '12 at 22:14
    
I do not know what I am asking : ) I am not thinking straight. thanks for your help. – akonsu Nov 21 '12 at 22:45

You could use the Hash#values_at method.

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Hash.html#method-i-values_at

data.values_at('GET','get', 'POST','post').first
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