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I have a vector of strings:

s <- c('abc1',   'abc2',   'abc3',   'abc11',   'abc12', 
       'abcde1', 'abcde2', 'abcde3', 'abcde11', 'abcde12', 
       'nonsense')

I would like a regular expression to match only the strings that begin with abc and end with 3, 11, or 12. In other words, the regex has to exclude abc1 but not abc11, abc2 but not abc12, and so on.

I thought that this would be easy to do with lookahead assertions, but I haven't found a way. Is there one?


EDIT: Thanks to posters below for pointing out a serious ambiguity in the original post.

In reality, I have many strings. They all end in digits: some in 0, some in 9, some in the digits in between. I am looking for a regex that will match all strings except those that end with a letter followed by a 1 or a 2. (The regex should also match only those strings that start with abc, but that's an easy problem.)

I tried to use negative lookahead assertions to create such a regex. But I didn't have any success.


Thanks to all who replied and commented. Inspired by several of you, I ended up using this combination: grepl('^abc', s) & !grepl('[[:lower:]][12]$', s).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of one complicated regular expression, in this case I think it's easier to use two simple regular expressions:

s <- c('abc1',   'abc2',   'abc3',   'abc11',   'abc12', 
       'abcde1', 'abcde2', 'abcde3', 'abcde11', 'abcde12', 
       'nonsense')

s[grepl("^abc", s) & grepl("(3|11|12)$", s)]
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Much more legible, +1! –  Stephan Kolassa Nov 22 '12 at 10:14

Is this what you want?

s[grepl("abc.*(3|11|12)", s)]
[1] "abc3"    "abc11"   "abc12"   "abcde3"  "abcde11" "abcde12"

And the excluded strings are:

s[!grepl("abc.*(3|11|12)", s)]
[1] "abc1"     "abc2"     "abcde1"   "abcde2"   "nonsense"

Edit: As the comments indicate, there is some ambiguity in your requirements. A more comprehensive regex will test for the string start ^ and string end $ and possibly only allow alphabet characters [[:alpha:]] before the final digits:

s[grepl("^abc[[:alpha:]]*.*(3|11|12)$", s)]
[1] "abc3"    "abc11"   "abc12"   "abcde3"  "abcde11" "abcde12"

You can also get grep to return the values directly, by passing the argument value=TRUE, thus saving a bit of duplication in the code:

grep("^abc[[:alpha:]]*.*(3|11|12)$", s, value=TRUE)
[1] "abc3"    "abc11"   "abc12"   "abcde3"  "abcde11" "abcde12"
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I propose a slight modification: grep("^abc.*(3|11|12)$", s, value=TRUE). ^ matches the beginning, $ the end of the string, as the OP required. –  Stephan Kolassa Nov 21 '12 at 22:16
    
That would also match things like abc33. –  Aust Nov 21 '12 at 22:16
    
@Aust: judging from the question, abc33 should indeed be matched ("begin with abc and end with 3" - nothing about not ending with 33). –  Stephan Kolassa Nov 21 '12 at 22:17
1  
Could also use grep( ..., value=TRUE) and grep( ..., value=TRUE, invert=TRUE). –  Josh O'Brien Nov 21 '12 at 22:19
1  
@Aust: ah, for unambiguously worded requirements ;-) –  Stephan Kolassa Nov 21 '12 at 22:19

You could use substring in this case too:

z <- nchar(s)
s[substring(s, 1, 3) == "abc" & substring(s, z) == "3" | 
    substring(s, z-1) %in%  c("12", "11")] 
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Looking specifically for the requested numbers gives this:

n <-  c(3,11,12)

s[sub('abc[^[:digit:]]*([[:digit:]]+)$',s, replacement='\\1') %in% n]
 [1] "abc3"    "abc11"   "abc12"   "abcde3"  "abcde11" "abcde12"

This doesn't confuse 11 for 1:

 n <-  c(3,1,12)

s[sub('abc[^[:digit:]]*([[:digit:]]+)$',s, replacement='\\1') %in% n]
 [1] "abc1"    "abc3"    "abc12"   "abcde1"  "abcde3"  "abcde12"

For your edit, not ending in 1 or 2 (and using two regular expressions)

s[grepl('^abc',s) & !(sub('.*[^[:digit:]]([[:digit:]]+)$',s, replacement='\\1') %in% c(1,2))]
[1] "abc3"    "abc11"   "abc12"   "abcde3"  "abcde11" "abcde12"
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