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I stumbled upon this T-SQL query created on a SQL Server 2005 database:

Select s_bs.ScheduleHeaderId, 
       s_bs.ScheduleBatchScheduleId, 
       FlowRateOperational.FlowRate, 
       BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.EffectiveStartTime, 
       BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.EffectiveEndTime
From BatchSchedule as bs 
Inner Join ConnectionPoint as cp on bs.ConnectionPointId = cp.ConnectionPointId 
Inner Join ScheduleBatch as s_b 
Inner Join ScheduleConnectionPoint as s_cp 
Inner Join ScheduleBatchSchedule as s_bs 
            on s_cp.ScheduleConnectionPointId = s_bs.ScheduleConnectionPointId 
            on s_b.ScheduleBatchId = s_bs.ScheduleBatchId 
            on cp.ConnectionPointName = s_cp.ConnectionPointName and bs.BatchID = s_b.BatchID 
Inner Join BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational on bs.BatchScheduleId = BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.BatchScheduleId 
Inner Join FlowRateOperational on BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.FlowRateOperationalId = FlowRateOperational.FlowRateOperationalId

I am not a SQL expert by far but at least I think I know how to join tables and I had never seen this way of joining tables before.

Is having several ON clauses together after their JOINS producing different results or increasing performance?

Why couldn't this person just move the joins around and keep the ON clauses beside their corresponding JOIN?

Thanks for any light you can shed on this "mystery" :)

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Who knew this was possible?! I didn't. –  usr Nov 21 '12 at 22:13
    
Does this work? –  codingbiz Nov 21 '12 at 22:15
    
...Under what circumstances is this possible? I'm unable to reproduce this behaviour - it's a syntax error. –  Dan J Nov 21 '12 at 22:17
    
I to have seen this once and I simply changed it to have the on with each join. Interested in hearing if there is a reason for doing this... certainly makes it hard to read and understand... –  SpectralGhost Nov 21 '12 at 22:41
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The ON clause can be placed right after each INNER JOIN (which looks nicer to me). But sometimes it's inevitable to put the ON clauses for the first couple of joins after a later join. For example the table which provides the join condition is not yet available in the JOIN chain, for example:

SELECT * FROM 
A INNER JOIN 
B INNER JOIN 
C 
   ON B.Col1 = C.Col1 
   ON A.Col2 = C.Col2

Look that both ON clauses are referring to C so the associated ON clause could not appear earlier. It can be prevented by putting C first, but depending on the usage, one may find it less readable.

The above is just from the syntax point of view. There should be some performance considerations as well, which I'm not aware of.

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I would be very interested in knowing how this syntax could enhance performance. If you could provide further explanation, an example and/or some further reading links it would be very appreciated. –  Sergio Romero Nov 22 '12 at 15:57
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When you have only inner joins, the order of joining does not matter. The result sets are the same. The two versions below are equivalent.

The common way of joining:

FROM 
    tableA AS a
  JOIN
    tableB AS b
      ON b.aid = a.aid
  JOIN
    tableC AS c
      ON c.bid = b.bid

And the not so common (notice the parentheses are only there for clarity of the precedence, they can be removed safely, as in your query):

FROM 
    tableA AS a
  JOIN
      (   tableB AS b
        JOIN
          tableC AS c
            ON c.bid = b.bid
      )
    ON b.aid = a.aid

When you have outer joins though (LEFT, RIGHT, or FULL), the situation is different. If you replace the JOIN with LEFT JOIN in the queries above, then they are not equivalent and may produce different results sets.

Even one of the (many) joins matters. The following two are not equivalent:

FROM 
    tableA AS a
  LEFT JOIN
    tableB AS b
      ON b.aid = a.aid
  JOIN
    tableC AS c
      ON c.bid = b.bid

FROM 
    tableA AS a
  LEFT JOIN
          tableB AS b
        JOIN
          tableC AS c
            ON c.bid = b.bid

    ON b.aid = a.aid
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this isn't an answer, just changed placement of the conditions (I think)

Select s_bs.ScheduleHeaderId, 
       s_bs.ScheduleBatchScheduleId, 
       f.FlowRate, 
       b.EffectiveStartTime, 
       b.EffectiveEndTime
From 

BatchSchedule as bs Inner Join 

ConnectionPoint as cp on 
   cp.ConnectionPointId=bs.ConnectionPointId  Inner Join 

ScheduleBatch as s_b on
s_b.BatchID=bs.BatchID Inner Join 

ScheduleConnectionPoint as s_cp  on 
   s_cp.ConnectionPointName=cp.ConnectionPointName  Inner Join

ScheduleBatchSchedule as s_bs on 
   s_bs.ScheduleConnectionPointId = s_cp.ScheduleConnectionPointId Inner Join 

BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational b on 
b.BatchScheduleId = bs.BatchScheduleId  Inner Join 

FlowRateOperational f on 
f.FlowRateOperationalId=b.FlowRateOperationalId

where
s_bs.ScheduleBatchId = s_b.ScheduleBatchId 

or you could put the where condition in an and statement after inner joining s_bs, but I think it stands out more if it's outside the chain.

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It makes no difference for inner joins, but it will of course produce completely different results for other sorts of joins.

As a contrived example, a LEFT JOIN (b CROSS JOIN c) ON b.a = a.a AND c.a = a.a will only return non-null rows for both tables b and c simultaneously, but a LEFT JOIN b ON b.a = a.a LEFT JOIN c ON c.a = a.a will evaluate the clauses independently.

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it actually makes a huge difference in performance!!! –  Aaron Kempf Nov 22 '12 at 2:41
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it just ugly written, I am pretty sure it's the same as :

    Select s_bs.ScheduleHeaderId, 
       s_bs.ScheduleBatchScheduleId, 
       FlowRateOperational.FlowRate, 
       BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.EffectiveStartTime, 
       BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.EffectiveEndTime
From BatchSchedule as bs 
Inner Join ConnectionPoint as cp on bs.ConnectionPointId = cp.ConnectionPointId 
Inner Join ScheduleBatch as s_b on s_b.BatchID = bs.BatchID
Inner Join ScheduleBatchSchedule as s_bs on s_b.ScheduleBatchId = s_bs.ScheduleBatchId 
Inner Join ScheduleConnectionPoint as s_cp on s_cp.ScheduleConnectionPointId = s_bs.ScheduleConnectionPointId and s_cp.ConnectionPointName = cp.ConnectionPointName
Inner Join BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational on bs.BatchScheduleId = BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.BatchScheduleId 
Inner Join FlowRateOperational on BatchScheduleFlowRateOperational.FlowRateOperationalId = FlowRateOperational.FlowRateOperationalId
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