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I want to implement behaviour similar to NSNotificationCenter's -addObserverForName:object:queue:usingBlock:. Using a method called something like

- (void)addRefetchObserver:(id)observer
                   handler:(FJRefetchHandler)handler;

a block should be stored for later invokation (FJRefetchHandler is defined like this: typedef void(^FJRefetchHandler)(void).

Because I want to remove the block later, I also store observer, and declare the following method:

- (void)removeRefetchObserver:(id)observer;

Usage would look like this:

// some place in code
[controller addRefetchObserver:self handler:^{
    // refetch some stuff, i.e.
    self.data = [self updateData];
}];    
// some other place in code:
[controller removeRefetchObserver:self];

My question is: How should I implement -addRefetchObserver:handler: so that I won't create any retain cycles? How should I store observers and handlers?

Apparently, NSNotificationCenter somehow stores the observer without retaining it - otherwise I would not be able to call [center removeObserver:self] in -dealloc because -dealloc would never get called.

Also, is there way to get around using __unsafe_unretained when referencing self in the block? i.e. like so:

__unsafe_unretained MyObject *blockSelf = self;
[controller addRefetchObserver:self handler:^{
    blockSelf.data = [blockSelf updateData];
}];
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apparently, NSNotificationCenter somehow stores the observer without retaining it - otherwise I would not be able to call [center removeObserver:self] in -dealloc because -dealloc would never get called.

Yes, they keep a weak reference to it. You can easily keep weak references to observers in your classes too: if you need to have a collection of weak references, you can make a non-retaining version of NSArray or NSSet or NSDictionary, using the Core Foundation functions to create CFArray / CFSet / CFDictionary (they are toll-free bridged with, i.e. the same as, the NS equivalents), which allow you to explicitly specify the retaining/releasing behavior; so to not have a strong reference, you just have it do nothing on retain and release.

That you are storing the observer is kind of weird. With NSNotificationCenter, they store the observer because they need both the observer and selector to make the call. With yours, the block is already enough to make the call, and the block encapsulates all the logic of using the observer, so to store separately an "observer" seems strange. It seems like the only reason you have it is to have a way to remove it. For that matter, it could be any object, as long as you pass the same one in to add as you do to remove.

Whereas NSNotificationCenter has just one reference to the "observer", your system has two references -- one as the "observer" passed in, but you also have a reference to the block, which in all likelihood has a reference to the "observer" also. If you want it to work the same way as NSNotificationCenter, you need to make sure that these are both weak references. I think you've figured this out -- the direct "observer" reference you keep weak using what I described in the first paragraph; the block's reference to the "observer" must also be weak.

Also, is there way to get around using __unsafe_unretained when referencing self in the block? i.e. like so:

What you have is the correct way to weak-reference something from a block. More specifically, you should use __weak if you are using ARC and targeting only iOS 5+. You should use __unsafe_unretained (like you have) if you are using ARC otherwise. You should use __block if you are not using ARC.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you answer. I'm going to use CF to store my objects then. You are right, I'm only storing 'observer' to have a way of removing it later. I just thought it was convenient, as a user does not have to worry about creating a unique object to pass as observer, and can just pass self. Storing the block would require the user to keep a reverence to it, which I think is inconvenient - I'd rather declare the block in place. But I'll think about this some more. –  fabian789 Nov 24 '12 at 7:29

The better way to call self inside a block is to copy the reference of self into same weak variables and use it inside the block as;

MyController __weak *__weakController = controller;
[__weakController addRefetchObserver:self handler:^{
    // refetch some stuff, i.e.
    __weakController.data = [__weakController updateData];
}];    
// some other place in code:
[controller removeRefetchObserver:self];

But, sometimes you may be dealing with long ongoing operation and meanwhile the controller may be released while the block is still in progress. Since block are placed on the stack and keep on executing, the better idea is to check if the controller still exists before calling some methods on it like;

 MyController __weak *__weakController = controller;
    [__weakController addRefetchObserver:self handler:^{
         // some long on going tasks ...
        MyController __strong *strongController = __weakController;
        if(strongController)
          strongController.data = [strongController updateData];
    }];    
    // some other place in code:
    [controller removeRefetchObserver:self];
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I never thought about checking if the controller still exists, thanks for that. –  fabian789 Nov 22 '12 at 17:27
    
One more thing the weak object inside the block can be garbage collected anytime. For that sake the variable is strongly referenced inside the block so that it remains until the block's lifetime. Since the controller now is has a limited scope inside the block the retain cycle is avoided. –  k6sandeep Nov 22 '12 at 19:30
    
You can avoid the "controller may be released while the block is still in progress" problem if you make sure to execute the block on the same thread as the controller is retained/released on. –  newacct Nov 22 '12 at 23:26
    
Yes it is indeed. If you are working with NSOperationQueue or gcd and doing something in another thread you controller may be released at the same time. But, does it matter even if I am not in the background queue. Testing whether the object exists and sending message to it is a good thing isn't it. –  k6sandeep Nov 23 '12 at 11:25

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