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I have a table like this:

+------+-------+
|ID    | value |
+------+-------+
| 1    | 150   |
| 2    |       |
| 3    |       |
| 4    |       |
| 5    | 530   |
| 6    | 950   |
| 7    | 651   |
+-------+------+

I want to copy the last 3 values and at the end my table will look like this:

+------+-------+
|ID    | value |
+------+-------+
| 1    | 150   |
| 2    | 530   |
| 3    | 950   |
| 4    | 651   |
| 5    | 530   |
| 6    | 950   |
| 7    | 651   |
+-------+------+

Is it possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a self-join:

UPDATE mytable m
SET    value = m0.value
FROM   mytable m0
WHERE  m.id = (m0.id - 3)   -- define offset
AND    m.id BETWEEN 2 AND 4 -- define range to be affected
AND    m.value IS NULL;     -- make sure only NULL values are updated

If there are gaps in the ID space, use the windows function row_number() to get gapless ID to work with. I do that in a CTE, because I am going to reuse the table twice for a self-join:

WITH x AS (
   SELECT *, row_number() OVER (ORDER BY ID) AS rn
   FROM   mytable
   )
UPDATE mytable m
SET    value = y.value
FROM   x
JOIN   x AS y ON x.rn = (y.rn - 4567)   -- JOIN CTE x AS y with an offset
WHERE  x.id = m.id                      -- JOIN CTE x to original
AND    m.id BETWEEN 1235 AND 3455
AND    m.value IS NULL;

You need PostgreSQL 9.1 or later for data-modifying CTEs.

share|improve this answer
    
you are awesome –  Farhad Irani Nov 22 '12 at 2:16
    
You do not need PostgreSQL 9.1 or later to run WITH x AS ( SELECT...) UPDATE mytable SET ... FROM x . Data-modifying CTEs actually mean UPDATE INSERT DELETE in the WITH part. Something like WITH x as (DELETE FROM t1 ... RETURNING t1.id) INSERT INTO t2 SELECT x.id FROM x –  Igor Romanchenko Nov 22 '12 at 10:10
    
@IgorRomanchenko: Your statement is incorrect, my answer is correct. Well, the term "data-modifying CTE" seems a bit misleading, since the CTE itself does not modify data. The key statement in the manual is: The sub-statements in WITH are executed concurrently with each other and with the main query. Either way, you need PostgreSQL 9.1 to use any data-modifying command in direct connection with a CTE. Consider this demo: sqlfiddle.com/#!11/53063/1. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 22 '12 at 12:37
    
Sorry. I'm using both 9.2 and 8.4 in production and was confused. + I'v read the manual. In "7.8.2. Data-Modifying Statements in WITH" there is always UPDATE INSERT DELETE in WITH part, so i thought it is about data modification in the CTE itself (WITH part). –  Igor Romanchenko Nov 22 '12 at 12:37

For an ad-hoc update like this, there probably isn't going to be a better way than three simple update statements:

UPDATE mytable SET value = 530 WHERE id = 2;
UPDATE mytable SET value = 950 WHERE id = 3;
UPDATE mytable SET value = 651 WHERE id = 4;

The question is, is this an ad-hoc update that only applies to this exact data, or a case of a general update rule that you want to implement for all possible data in that table? If so, then we need more detail.

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no the query has more than 10000 rows. I can't do it this way –  Farhad Irani Nov 22 '12 at 1:03
    
So... we need more information. You said you want to copy the last 3 values. Is it always the values from the last three rows ordered by id? Are you always copying them onto rows with empty values? How does each row get assigned one of the last 3 values? –  Edmund Nov 22 '12 at 1:07
    
no it is not 3. at least 2000 records. yes they're ordered by id. yes i'm copying to rows with empty values. –  Farhad Irani Nov 22 '12 at 1:15

The hard-coded 3 appears twice and would be replaced by however many rows you want. It assumes the last 3 records actually have values. It takes those values and applies them in sequence to the set of records with null values.

update a
  set value = x.value
  from (

        select nullRows.id, lastRows.value

          from ( select id, value
                       ,(row_number() over(order by id) - 1) % 3 + 1 AS key
                   from ( select id, value
                            from a
                            order by id desc
                            limit 3
                        ) x
                   order by 1

               ) AS lastRows

              ,( select id
                       ,(row_number() over(order by id) - 1) % 3 + 1 AS key
                   from a
                   where value is null
                   order by id

               ) AS nullRows

         where lastRows.key = nullRows.key

      ) x

where a.id = x.id
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