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Here I have a function which I use to calculate the difference between two Time variables, start and end, and display the output as 'Past', 'Current', or 'Future'.

I was able to calculate 'Current' and 'Future' values, but no luck with "Past'. Here is the jsFiddle and any help would be great.

On a side note, I do prefer a plugin-less way to achieve this.

//My Start time and End time
var start = "Mon Nov 22 2012 08:45:00 GMT+0800 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time)";
var end = "Mon Nov 22 2012 10:15:00 GMT+0800 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time)";

//Calling to test function
test(start, end);

//Function to calculate 
function test(startTime, endTime) {
    startTime= new Date(startTime);
    endTime= new Date(endTime);
    var currentTime = new Date();
    var difference = currentTime - startTime; 

    if (difference > 0 && currentTime > startTime) {
        alert ("Past!");
    } 

    if(startTime < currentTime && currentTime < endTime){ 
        alert("Current!");
    }

    if(difference < -1){
        alert("Future!");
    }
}​

Link to jsFiddle

share|improve this question
    
So... Past is when start < end < current, current is when start < current < end, and future is when current < start < end? –  MathWizz Nov 22 '12 at 1:23
    
This makes little sense. –  Lee Taylor Nov 22 '12 at 1:36
    
I don't see no stinkin' jQuery, we've been flim-flamed!! –  RobG Nov 22 '12 at 2:40
    
You should not expect Date to consistently parse strings in all browsers, e.g. "Mon Nov 22 2012 08:45:00 GMT+0800" can be considered an invalid date, so conforming browsers will return NaN, others will ignore the incorrect day and return a date object for Thursday, 22 Nov 2012. Break it up and manually parse it, then you'll get consistent results. –  RobG Nov 22 '12 at 2:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sigh!! I just need some sleep. It's working and here's the updated jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/9jk6a/9/

Thanks everyone who helped.

//My Start time and End time
var start = "Mon Nov 23 2012 08:45:00 GMT+0800 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time)";
var end = "Mon Nov 23 2012 10:15:00 GMT+0800 (Malay Peninsula Standard Time)";

//Calling to test function
test(start, end);

//Function to calculate 
function test(startTime, endTime) {
    startTime= new Date(startTime);
    endTime= new Date(endTime);
    var currentTime = new Date();
    var difference = currentTime - startTime; 

    if (startTime < endTime && endTime < currentTime) {
        alert ("Past!");
    } 

    if(startTime < currentTime && currentTime < endTime){ 
        alert("Current!");
    }

    if(currentTime < startTime && startTime < endTime){
        alert("Future!");
    }
}​
share|improve this answer

You should compare the values of someDate.getTime(), as it will give you an integer representing the unix epoch (time ellapsed since 1/1/1970), wich will be comparable and substractable.

I edited the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/9jk6a/12/

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
There is no need for getTime, using a date object for arithmetic operations effectively calls it anyway (incidentally, the time value is UTC, not that it makes any difference here). –  RobG Nov 22 '12 at 2:43

This is redundant:

 var difference = currentTime - startTime; 

 if (difference > 0 && currentTime > startTime)

Given the assignment, difference > 0 and currentTime > startTime are testing exactly the same condition. If one is true the other will always also be true, so there is no reason to test both.

Really, all you need is this:

if (startTime > endTime) {
   throw "Invalid range: end precedes start";
}

if (startTime < currentTime) {
    if (endTime < currentTime) {
         alert("Past");
    } else {
         alert("Current");
    }
} else {
  alert ("Future");
}
share|improve this answer

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