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I have some benchmark queries in a .sql file. If i use source in mysql to execute them, mysql will show run time after each query. And there are pages and pages query outputs. Is there any way that I can obtain the total run time of all queries?

Thanks a lot!

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subtract earliest timestamp from latest lol –  Drew Pierce Nov 22 '12 at 1:30
    
are they being logged to a table or are we left to wonder –  Drew Pierce Nov 22 '12 at 1:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for all the suggestions. I end up created another table just to record the start and end time of each query in the .sql file.

I edited the .sql file, add an insert statement after each original query just to record the time. At the end, I can query this "time" table for profiling the .sql file execution.

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You can use MySQL's built in profiling support by adding this line to your my.cnf:

SET profiling=1;

This allows you to easily see the time it took for each query:

mysql> SHOW PROFILES;
+----------+-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Query_ID | Duration    | Query                                                             |
+----------+-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
|        1 |  0.33174700 | SELECT COUNT(*) FROM myTable WHERE extra LIKE '%zkddj%'           | 
|        2 |  0.00036600 | SELECT COUNT(id) FROM myTable                                     | 
|        3 |  0.00087700 | CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE foo LIKE myTable                           | 
|        4 | 33.52952000 | INSERT INTO foo SELECT * FROM myTable                             | 
|        5 |  0.06431200 | DROP TEMPORARY TABLE foo                                          | 
+----------+-------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

You can them sum up the times to get the total time:

SELECT SUM(Duration) from information_schema.profiling;

You can find more details on MySQL's profiling here.

Another approach you could take it to run execute the SQL queries from command line and use the Unix time command to time the execution. This may, however, not give you the most precise time though. Additionally, it won't give you a breakdown of how long each query took unless you use it in combination with MySQL profiling.

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Thanks a lot, aam1r. Is there a way to show just query and duration. My queries are too long and it is difficult to view. Or is there any way that I can query this "profiles" table? If I am going to run the benchmark again, how to clean up the profiles table? –  Alfred Zhong Nov 22 '12 at 2:09
    
@AlfredZhong: I haven't tried this but I would suggest trying running queries off information_schema.profiling -- just like we are to get the total sum. So, SELECT Query_ID, Duration FROM information_schema.profiling to get just the query ID and duration. Maybe there's a better way to do it. I would love to know about it if there is. –  aam1r Nov 22 '12 at 2:18

you could modify your .sql to create a begin and end row with a timestamp and then subtract without having to bring out an excel spreadsheet and add it up.

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Thanks a lot, @Drew. What is the syntax of mysql to put a timestamp? –  Alfred Zhong Nov 22 '12 at 2:11

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