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I'm trying to sync up multiple ajax callbacks using jQuery.Deferrd objects. Obviously jQuery.when handles this for you however my code is architected in such a way that the ajax requests aren't called in the same method. So for example this is the flow:

// A Button is clicked

// Module 1 requests a snippet of html and updates the DOM

// Module 2 requests a different snippet of html and updates the DOM

I need both Modules to update the DOM at the same time meaning I need to ensure the callbacks are run after both requests have returned.

Module 1 and Module 2 need to be able to exist without each other and should have no knowledge of one another so the requests can't be made together using $.when(doMod1Request(), doMod2Request()).then(function () { ... }) and the callbacks should be independent too.

I've therefore written a wrapper around ajax which adds the callbacks to a deferred object and in a similar way to $.when resolves the deferred object once the ajax requests have returned the same number of times as the number of callbacks on the deferred object.

My dilemma is however deferred.resolve() can only be called with one set of arguments so each callback get's the same value.

e.g.

var deferred = new $.Deferred();
deferred.done(function (response) {
    console.log(response); // <div class="html-snippet-1"></div>
});
deferred.done(function (response) {
    console.log(response); // <div class="html-snippet-1"></div>
});
deferred.resolve('<div class="html-snippet-1"></div>');

Whereas I'd want something like this:

var deferred = new $.Deferred();
deferred.done(function (response) {
    console.log(response); // <div class="html-snippet-1"></div>
});
deferred.done(function (response) {
    console.log(response); // <div class="html-snippet-2"></div>
});
deferred.resolve(['<div class="html-snippet-1"></div>', '<div class="html-snippet-2"></div>']);

Is this possible or am I going about this incorrectly?

share|improve this question
1  
$.when(doMod1Request(), doMod2Request()).then(function () { ... }) is 100% logical to achieve your objective. Why do you say you can't do this? –  Beetroot-Beetroot Nov 22 '12 at 2:06
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot OP stated: "Module 1 and Module 2 need to be able to exist without each other and should have no knowledge of one another" –  Šime Vidas Nov 22 '12 at 2:08
    
@ŠimeVidas, yes, I know he said that, but it's not relevant. The two functions can be in different scopes. What is relevant is that both are within the scope of the $.when(...) statement. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Nov 22 '12 at 2:10
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot - Šime Vidas is correct to emphasize that part of my issue. There could be 10 requests here, it doesn't scale to have each response handled in the same callback function. The two modules need to work independently. –  riscarrott Nov 22 '12 at 2:15
1  
There's nothing to prevent them working independently when you want them to do so. But you say "I need both Modules to update the DOM at the same time meaning I need to ensure the callbacks are run after both requests have returned." Therefore you need a statement (your $.when() statement) to address both modules. Therefore, you need to ensure that both modules are within scope. Get the scope right then worry about how to resolve the deferreds. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Nov 22 '12 at 2:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd say this is perfectly valid. Assuming your independent modules, you would do (with two Promises):

doMod1Request().done(doMod1Update);
doMod2Request().done(doMod2Update);

Now, if you want to to execute the updates together and only if the two requests both succeeded, just write

$.when(doMod1Request(), doMod2Request().done(function(mod1result, mod2result) {
    doMod1Update(mod1result);
    doMod2Update(mod2result);
});

This only gets ugly if you call your resolve functions with multiple arguments, as jQuery is a bit inconsistent there and does not really distinguish multiple arguments from one array argument.

To uncouple them with that publish-subscribe pattern you are using, I'd recommend the following:

function Combination() {
    this.deferreds = [];
    this.success = [];
    this.error = [];
}
Combination.prototype.add = function(def, suc, err) {
    this.deffereds.push(def);
    this.success.push(suc);
    this.error.push(err);
};
Combination.prototype.start = function() {
    var that = this;
    return $.when.apply($, this.deferreds).always(function() {
         for (var i=0; i<that.deferreds.length; i++)
             that.deferreds[i].done(that.success[i]).fail(that.error[i]);
         // of course we could also call them directly with the arguments[i]
    });
};

// Then do
var comb = new Combination();
window.notifyModules("something happened", comb); // get deferreds and handlers
comb.start();

// and in each module
window.listen("something happended", function(c) {
    c.add(doRequest(), doUpdate, doErrorHandling);
});
share|improve this answer
    
I need the modules to work independently so for example here if I were to remove mod1 I'd have to amend the code that makes the request and handles the callback. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 1:08
    
Yes, of course, you always had to do that. Still the modules themselves do work independently. –  Bergi Dec 4 '12 at 1:26
    
mmm, perhaps I'm not explaining independent very well; what I mean is the code will work even if one of the modules was removed from the code. You'd get an exception with your example because you're calling methods directly on each module which results in tightly coupled code. The second code block of the accepted answer demonstrates three modules that work independently from one another. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 1:42
    
But you said you wanted to couple them (timing their DOM manipulation together). That means there needs to be a piece of code that knows of all the modules. Of course you might let the modules register themselves there. –  Bergi Dec 4 '12 at 1:47
    
Timing there DOM manipulation doesn't mean they're directly related, for example it could be a case that they both need to react to a change in the state of the application so two modules might listen to the notification, for example on a checkout page, 'gift-card-added' and both would update themselves accordingly. It's unsightly and off putting when you see this DOM update happen sequentially so it makes sense for the callbacks to be deferred to the same time. This doesn't however mean that the code that updates each part of the DOM should therefore be coupled together... –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 1:59

Let's assume your modules look something like this :

var MODULE_1 = function() {
    function getSnippet() {
        return $.ajax({
            //ajax options here
        });
    }

    return {
        getSnippet: getSnippet
    }
}();

var MODULE_2 = function() {
    function getSnippet() {
        return $.ajax({
            //ajax options here
        });
    }

    return {
        getSnippet: getSnippet
    }
}();

Don't worry if your modules are different, the important thing is that the getSnippet functions each return a jqXHR object, which (as of jQuery 1.5) implements the Promise interface.

Now, let's assume you want to fetch the two snippets in response to some event (say a button click) and do something when both ajax responses have been received, then the click handler will be something like this:

$("myButton").on('click', function(){
    var snippets = [];
    var promises_1 = MODULE_1.getSnippet().done(function(response){
        snippets.push({
            target: $("#div_1"),
            response: response
        });
    });
    var promise_2 = MODULE_2.getSnippet().done(function(response){
        snippets.push({
            target: $("#div_2"),
            response: response
        });
    });
    $.when(promise_1, promise_2).done(function() {
        $.each(snippets, function(i, snippetObj) {
            snippetObj.target.html(snippetObj.response);
        });
    });
});

Slightly more elaborate, and better if you have many similarly constructed modules to fetch many snippets, would be something like this:

$(function(){
    $("myButton").on('click', function(){
        var promises = [];
        var snippets = [];
        var modules = [MODULE_1, MODULE_2, MODULE_3 .....];
        for (var i=1; i<=10; i++) {
            promises.push(modules[i].getSnippet().done(function(response){
                snippets.push({
                    target: $("#div_" + i),
                    response: response
                };
            }));
        }
        $.when.apply(this, promises).done(function() {
            $.each(snippets, function(i, snippetObj) {
                snippetObj.target.html(snippetObj.response);
            });
        });
    });
});

As you can see, I've made heaps of assumptions here, but you should get some idea of how to proceed.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue here is the modules won't work independently. They are both dependent on the click handler of .myButton. My app architecture doesn't allow public APIs across modules so if we were to consider the click handler a third module it too should have no knowledge of module1 and module2 so shouldn't be relied upon to call the getSnippet functions. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 0:57
    
I know it may sounds like I'm imposing restrictions for no reason but as a bit of background my goal is to ensure the code is loosely coupled so a 'module' is considered an independent component that's made up of HTML, CSS and JavaScript all of which cannot be modified by other modules. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 1:02
    
@riscarrott, that makes the question more about variable scope and modularisation than resolving Deferreds. Modules should (generally) not modify each other but that doesn't mean they shouldn't call each other's methods. Providing the ability to do so is pretty well central to the concept of modularisation. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 4 '12 at 4:31
    
Not really, the question was specifically about how I can pass in different arguments to callbacks on the same deferred object. The modularisation has been raised to indicate why $.when doesn't work for me; although saying that Bergi has demonstrated a pattern that allows me to use $.when whilst still maintaining this modularity. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 11:30

To ensure each callback is passed the appropriate arguments I've done the following:

var guid = 0,
    deferreds = [];

window.request = function (url, deferred, success) {
    var requestId = guid++;

    if ($.inArray(deferred) === -1) {
        deferreds.push(deferred);
        $.extend(deferred, {
            requestCount: 0,
            responseCount: 0,
            args: {}
        });
    }

    deferred.requestCount++;

    deferred
        .done(function () {
            // Corresponding arguments are passed into success callback using requestId
            // which is unique to each request.
            success.apply(this, deferred.args[requestId]);
        });

    $.ajax(url, {
        success: function () {
            // Store arguments on deferrds args obj.
            deferred.args[requestId] = arguments;

            deferred.responseCount++;
            if (deferred.requestCount === deferred.responseCount) {
                deferred.resolveWith(this);
            }
        } 
    });
};

So the arguments are managed through the closure. This allows me to ensure that both modules have no knowledge of each other and won't break if the other doesn't exist, e.g:

var MODULE_1 = function () {
    $(".myButton").on('click', function() {
        // Cross module communication is achieved through notifications.
        // Pass along a new deferred object with notification for use in window.request
        window.notify('my-button-clicked', new $.Deferred);
    });
}();

var MODULE_2 = function () {
    // run get snippet when 'my-button-clicked' notification is fired
    window.listen('my-button-clicked', getSnippet);

    function getSnippet (deferred) {
        window.request('/module2', deferred, function () {
            console.log('module2 success');
        });
    }
}();

var MODULE_3 = function () {
    // run get snippet when 'my-button-clicked' notification is fired
    window.listen('my-button-clicked', getSnippet);

    function getSnippet (deferred) {
        window.request('/module3', deferred, function () {
            console.log('module3 success');
        });
    }
}();

The above allows each module to function independently meaning one will work without the other which loosely couples the code and because both MODULE_2 and MODULE_3 pass the same deferred object into window.request they will be resolved once both requests have successfully returned.

This was my final implementation: https://github.com/richardscarrott/ply/blob/master/src/ajax.js

share|improve this answer
    
I think the independence of the modules is gained here with the publish-subscribe pattern. Therefore, not the internals of the request function are the essence of the answer, but the notify and listen functions. –  Bergi Dec 4 '12 at 1:58
    
Sure the pub / sub pattern is used here to keep the modules independent but this independence could not be achieved when making the ajax requests using $.when which was the issue. The request function provides a similar end result to $.when but ensures the modules are kept independent. –  riscarrott Dec 4 '12 at 2:08
    
Of course you can use $.when together with the pub/sub pattern, see my extended answer –  Bergi Dec 4 '12 at 2:18

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