Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
kernel=`uname -s`        # Current Kernel name
user=`whoami`            # Current Unix username
time=`date +%H:%M`       # Output current time
current_dir=$(pwd)       # Shell's current location
script_dir=$(dirname $0) # This script's current location

# This if statement is to know the correct location of the script, if the
# shell's location is the same as the script's location
if [ $script_dir = '.' ]; then
    script_dir="$current_dir"
fi

if [ $kernel == 'Linux' ]; then
    # Making symlinks to Vim files, add yours as you need
    echo 'Making symlinks to Vim files'
    ln -s -v $script_dir/vim /home/$user/.vim
    ln -s -v $script_dir/vim/vimrc /home/$user/.vimrc
    ln -s -v $script_dir/vim/gvimrc /home/$user/.gvimrc
    echo "Done at [$time]...\n"

    # Making symlinks to Zsh files, add yours as you need
    echo 'Making symlinks to Zsh files'
    ln -s -v $script_dir/zsh /home/$user/.zsh
    ln -s -v $script_dir/zsh/zshrc /home/$user/.zshrc
    echo "Done at [$time]...\n"

    # Making symlinks to Git files, add yours as you need
    echo 'Making symlinks to Git files'
    ln -s -v $script_dir/git/gitconfig /home/$user/.gitconfig
    ln -s -v $script_dir/git/gitmessage.txt /home/$user/.gitmessage.txt
    echo "Done at [$time]...\n"
fi

Would this work with no problems in Linux? I'm trying to make a make_symlinks.sh file, so I gotta check for Darwin (which already works), but since I don't have a Linux machine to test with, I don't know if this script would work in Linux.

So, does this work? Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Wooble, ruakh, Jonathan Leffler, Rüdiger Hanke, Timmy O'Mahony Nov 22 '12 at 21:50

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Wow, is it really that hard to examine it and tell me if it would work or not? Why the dislikes? At least show me where I went wrong. I'm asking the people that have Linux and know what they're talking about, of course. –  Greduan Nov 22 '12 at 3:58
    
We're not here to remotely test your code for you. Get access to a linux box and try it out. –  Timmy O'Mahony Nov 22 '12 at 21:50
    
I'm on a Mac, last time I tried installing Ubuntu I couldn't access internet. :/ –  Greduan Nov 23 '12 at 3:04
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A modified version of your script gives:

kernel=Linux
user=david
time=23:04
current_dir=/home/david/SO/Test
script_dir=/home/david/SO/Test


modified script:

kernel=`uname -s`        # Current Kernel name
user=`whoami`            # Current Unix username
time=`date +%H:%M`       # Output current time
current_dir=$(pwd)       # Shell's current location
script_dir=$(dirname $0) # This script's current location

# This if statement is to know the correct location of the script, if     the
# shell's location is the same as the script's location
if [ $script_dir = '.' ]; then
    script_dir="$current_dir"
fi

if [ $kernel == 'Linux' ]; then
  echo "kernel=$kernel" 
  echo "user=$user" 
  echo "time=$time"
  echo "current_dir=$current_dir" 
  echo "script_dir=$script_dir" 
fi

Your ln commands would work:

NAME
       ln - make links between files

SYNOPSIS
       ln [OPTION]... [-T] TARGET LINK_NAME   (1st form)
       ln [OPTION]... TARGET                  (2nd form)
       ln [OPTION]... TARGET... DIRECTORY     (3rd form)
       ln [OPTION]... -t DIRECTORY TARGET...  (4th form)
#[...]
       -s, --symbolic
              make symbolic links instead of hard links

       -v, --verbose
              print name of each linked file
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, this is what I needed to know. So, this would generate the correct symlinks to the correct places correct? You can exchange it for your own dotfiles' locations, to test it I mean. –  Greduan Nov 22 '12 at 4:08
    
Excellent! And just to confirm, those are the correct file names in Linux right? –  Greduan Nov 22 '12 at 4:11
    
@Eduan, the names of your dotfile seem OK. I see no reason for them to have different names between Darwin and Linux. –  David L. Nov 22 '12 at 4:55
    
Excellent! Thanks for all your help! :) –  Greduan Nov 22 '12 at 13:39
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.