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I have a remote CSV like this:

EUR/USD,1353555876030,1.28,435,1.28,442,1.28261,1.28703,1.28278
USD/JPY,1353555897400,82.,448,82.,449,82.370,82.594,82.524
GBP/USD,1353555880620,1.59,610,1.59,618,1.59496,1.59722,1.59524
EUR/GBP,1353555883845,0.80,464,0.80,480,0.80374,0.80590,0.80416
USD/CHF,1353555869856,0.93,793,0.93,807,0.93549,0.93919,0.93886
EUR/JPY,1353555897821,105.,894,105.,901,105.825,106.267,105.862
EUR/CHF,1353555869848,1.20,470,1.20,491,1.20395,1.20509,1.20434
USD/CAD,1353555889301,0.99,580,0.99,595,0.99555,0.99684,0.99623
AUD/USD,1353555900458,1.03,892,1.03,901,1.03658,1.04019,1.03691
GBP/JPY,1353555897599,131.,593,131.,603,131.516,131.890,131.642

what is the best way to send all this information to my mySQL database? (I want to refresh and update the price every second)

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closed as not a real question by Ja͢ck, Don Roby, Linus Kleen, akjoshi, Robin Nov 22 '12 at 16:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Every second? Looks like bad design to me, it should only need to be updated when the file changes. – Ja͢ck Nov 22 '12 at 3:51
    
Do you get only the values that are updated? or do you get the entire pricing file from the remote location? – jaipster Nov 22 '12 at 3:53
    
@jack the whole pricing file updates every second, there are many changes so i thought it would be better i just update the entire table to my database – Michael Lam Nov 22 '12 at 4:00
    
@johnbravo entire pricing file – Michael Lam Nov 22 '12 at 4:00
    
Off topic: I'm fairly certain whatever service you're getting this from will cut you off if you load it every second. Most exchange rate services have a minimum interval time of 5 minutes between reloads. – Steven Moseley Nov 22 '12 at 4:22

However you decide to get the CSV contents to PHP, make sure you're using fgetcsv() to do the actual CSV parsing.

<?php

$csv = <<<EOT
EUR/USD,1353555876030,1.28,435,1.28,442,1.28261,1.28703,1.28278
USD/JPY,1353555897400,82.,448,82.,449,82.370,82.594,82.524
GBP/USD,1353555880620,1.59,610,1.59,618,1.59496,1.59722,1.59524
EUR/GBP,1353555883845,0.80,464,0.80,480,0.80374,0.80590,0.80416
USD/CHF,1353555869856,0.93,793,0.93,807,0.93549,0.93919,0.93886
EUR/JPY,1353555897821,105.,894,105.,901,105.825,106.267,105.862
EUR/CHF,1353555869848,1.20,470,1.20,491,1.20395,1.20509,1.20434
USD/CAD,1353555889301,0.99,580,0.99,595,0.99555,0.99684,0.99623
AUD/USD,1353555900458,1.03,892,1.03,901,1.03658,1.04019,1.03691
GBP/JPY,1353555897599,131.,593,131.,603,131.516,131.890,131.642
EOT;

// create a read/write location in memory
$handle=fopen("php://memory", "rw");

// copy the CSV to memory
fwrite($handle, $csv);

// rewind the handle to the beginning of the CSV
fseek($handle, 0);

// read the CSV from memory
while (($row=fgetcsv($handle)) !== false) {

    // handle each row
    print_r($row);

    // do whatever mysql operations you want here
    // ...
};

Output

Array
(
    [0] => EUR/USD
    [1] => 1353555876030
    [2] => 1.28
    [3] => 435
    [4] => 1.28
    [5] => 442
    [6] => 1.28261
    [7] => 1.28703
    [8] => 1.28278
)
Array
(
    [0] => USD/JPY
    [1] => 1353555897400
    [2] => 82.
    [3] => 448
    [4] => 82.
    [5] => 449
    [6] => 82.370
    [7] => 82.594
    [8] => 82.524
)
Array
(
    [0] => GBP/USD
    [1] => 1353555880620
    [2] => 1.59
    [3] => 610
    [4] => 1.59
    [5] => 618
    [6] => 1.59496
    [7] => 1.59722
    [8] => 1.59524
)
Array
(
    [0] => EUR/GBP
    [1] => 1353555883845
    [2] => 0.80
    [3] => 464
    [4] => 0.80
    [5] => 480
    [6] => 0.80374
    [7] => 0.80590
    [8] => 0.80416
)
Array
(
    [0] => USD/CHF
    [1] => 1353555869856
    [2] => 0.93
    [3] => 793
    [4] => 0.93
    [5] => 807
    [6] => 0.93549
    [7] => 0.93919
    [8] => 0.93886
)
Array
(
    [0] => EUR/JPY
    [1] => 1353555897821
    [2] => 105.
    [3] => 894
    [4] => 105.
    [5] => 901
    [6] => 105.825
    [7] => 106.267
    [8] => 105.862
)
Array
(
    [0] => EUR/CHF
    [1] => 1353555869848
    [2] => 1.20
    [3] => 470
    [4] => 1.20
    [5] => 491
    [6] => 1.20395
    [7] => 1.20509
    [8] => 1.20434
)
Array
(
    [0] => USD/CAD
    [1] => 1353555889301
    [2] => 0.99
    [3] => 580
    [4] => 0.99
    [5] => 595
    [6] => 0.99555
    [7] => 0.99684
    [8] => 0.99623
)
Array
(
    [0] => AUD/USD
    [1] => 1353555900458
    [2] => 1.03
    [3] => 892
    [4] => 1.03
    [5] => 901
    [6] => 1.03658
    [7] => 1.04019
    [8] => 1.03691
)
Array
(
    [0] => GBP/JPY
    [1] => 1353555897599
    [2] => 131.
    [3] => 593
    [4] => 131.
    [5] => 603
    [6] => 131.516
    [7] => 131.890
    [8] => 131.642
)
[Finished in 0.1s]

Please note, if you have the CSV available as a file somewhere on your file system, there's no reason to load the entire thing into memory. In that case, use fopen() and pass in the filename and the r parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
This is useful, thank you! however, the file is from another url – Michael Lam Nov 22 '12 at 4:04
    
was thinking of using files_get_content – Michael Lam Nov 22 '12 at 4:05
2  
@MichaelLam If you use file_get_contents(), you can't do fgetcsv() on it unless you copy it into php://memory again. – Ja͢ck Nov 22 '12 at 4:06
    
@MichaelLam, @Jack is right; You'll want to use fgetcsv() directly here. – maček Nov 22 '12 at 4:07
1  
+ Very smart copying data to memory .... – Baba Nov 26 '12 at 3:07

If you have a CSV file, the fastest way to import into a MySQL database is using LOAD DATA INFILE, e.g.:

LOAD DATA INFILE 'exchange_rates.csv' 
INTO TABLE exchange_rates (@var1, @var2, @var3, @var4)
SET 
    from_currency = @var1, 
    to_currency = @var2,
    exchange_rate = @var3,
    etc...
share|improve this answer
    
Great recommendation. If the OP doesn't need fine-tuned control over the rows/columns, this is a great bulk insert solution. – maček Nov 22 '12 at 4:09
    
Works with fine-tuned control as well. In my example above, I showed how to retrieve the columns of the CSV into variables and subsequently set them to specific column names in the table. Other operations could be performed as well, such as splitting the first column into two currency code columns. – Steven Moseley Nov 22 '12 at 4:19

You can run Scheduling jobs like Cron Scheduler which would take your CSV entries, format into INSERT SQL statements and fire the query.

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I would suggest you compare the two latest files and just update the changes rather than updating the whole table all the time

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