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So I'm making a game, and all objects derive from one GameObject class, which looks something like this;

class GameObject(pygame.sprite.DirtySprite):
    actions = dict()

    def __init__(self):
        pygame.sprite.DirtySprite.__init__(self)
        self.rect  = None
        self.state = None

    def update(self):
        if callable(self.__class__.actions[self.state]):
        #If this key has a function for its element...
            self.__class__.actions[self.state](self)

Now, I'm running into another issue with inheritance. Observe the class below, and the two that derive from it;

class Bullet(gameobject.GameObject):
    FRAME  = pygame.Rect(23, 5, 5, 5)
    STATES = config.Enum('IDLE', 'FIRED', 'MOVING', 'RESET')

    def __init__(self):
        gameobject.GameObject.__init__(self)
        self.image = config.SPRITES.subsurface(self.__class__.FRAME)
        self.rect  = self.__class__.START_POS.copy()
        self.state = self.__class__.STATES.IDLE

    actions = {
               STATES.IDLE   : None        ,
               STATES.FIRED  : start_moving,
               STATES.MOVING : move        ,
               STATES.RESET  : reset       ,
              }

class ShipBullet(bullet.Bullet):
    SPEED     = -8
    START_POS = pygame.Rect('something')

    def __init__(self):
        super(self.__class__, self).__init__()
        self.add(ingame.PLAYER)

class EnemyBullet(bullet.Bullet):
    SPEED     = 2
    START_POS = pygame.Rect('something else')

    def __init__(self):
        super(self.__class__, self).__init__()
        self.add(ingame.ENEMIES)

Every element of Bullet.actions (a static member, mind you) except for None is a function held within Bullet. Bullet is not meant to be created on its own; if this were C++, it would be an abstract class. So what happens is, Bullet's subclasses search through Bullet.actions every frame to decide what to do next, depending on their state (are they moving, were they just shot, etc.). However, since the elements of Bullet.actions are Bullet's own methods, its subclasses are executing those instead of their own extended versions (which call the parent methods). I don't want to have to duplicate this dict of callbacks for memory usage reasons. So, I ask this; how can I have an instance of a subclass look through it's parents dictionary full of callback methods, and execute their own version if it exists, and their parent's version if it doesn't?

share|improve this question
    
Where are start_moving, move, etc. defined in your code? –  BrenBarn Nov 22 '12 at 4:01
    
They are defined below whateverclass.__init__, but above whateverclass.actions. I just left them out in the interest of clarity. –  JesseTG Nov 23 '12 at 2:58
1  
Why are you making actions a class variable? –  BrenBarn Nov 25 '12 at 5:42
    
Because there will be multiple instances of most objects (i.e. multiple aliens, multiple blocks, multiple particles, etc.), and having every object store the same actions dict (and thus be capable of the same actions) is a waste of memory. –  JesseTG Nov 25 '12 at 19:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

One possible solution is to store the function's name instead of direct references and using getattr to retrieve the correct reference:

actions = {
           STATES.IDLE   : None          ,
           STATES.FIRED  : 'start_moving',
           STATES.MOVING : 'move'        ,
           STATES.RESET  : 'reset'       ,
          }

[...]

def update(self):
    method_name = self.__class__.actions[self.state]
    if method_name and callable(getattr(self, method_name)):
        getattr(self, method_name)(self)

For a speedup, you can pre-compute this table when initializing the object:

class Bullet(gameobject.GameObject):

    FRAME  = pygame.Rect(23, 5, 5, 5)
    STATES = config.Enum('IDLE', 'FIRED', 'MOVING', 'RESET')

    action_names = {
                     STATES.IDLE   : None          ,
                     STATES.FIRED  : 'start_moving',
                     STATES.MOVING : 'move'        ,
                     STATES.RESET  : 'reset'       ,
                    }

    def __init__(self):
        gameobject.GameObject.__init__(self)
        self.image = config.SPRITES.subsurface(self.__class__.FRAME)
        self.rect  = self.__class__.START_POS.copy()
        self.state = self.__class__.STATES.IDLE

        # Update actions table using getattr, so we get the correct
        # method for subclasses.
        self.actions = {}
        for state, method_name in self.action_names.items():
            if method_name and callable(getattr(self, method_name)):
                self.actions[state] = getattr(self, method_name)
            else:
                self.actions[state] = lambda self: None


    def update(self):
        self.actions[self.state]()

Notice that since the code in __init__ uses getattr, it can be placed in Bullet.__init__ and merely extended by the other classes. As you already call the super constructor, there would be no need to change the extending classes or even annotate them.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this just a more complicated version of what I originally did? (i.e. before I posted this thread, each object just had its own version of actions, which was identical throughout the entire class.) Is this a tradeoff between speed and memory? –  JesseTG Nov 25 '12 at 19:17
1  
@JesseTG: Yes, there is a tradeoff between speed and memory. At some point you need to look up the action on the instance. You can either do this lookup once at instance creation and store the result (using memory), or you can do the lookup every time you need the value (giving up speed). –  BrenBarn Nov 25 '12 at 19:42
    
@JesseTG I don't think this is a more complicated version. The base class is more complex, but now you can simply extend it and the update function will just work, without having to rewrite the actions for every subclass or converting them manually. –  BoppreH Nov 25 '12 at 21:17
    
Hrm, I think I'll go with this one, then. Thank you very much! –  JesseTG Nov 27 '12 at 17:39

Extending BoppreH's answer, you could get rid of the getattr lookup by filling the activity dict with the right methods at class creation, using a class decorator like this:

def generateActions(cls):
    cls.actions = {}
    for a, f in cls.genactions.items():
        cls.actions[a] = getattr(cls, f) if f else lambda *_: None
    return cls

Notice that actions is filled with a do-nothing lambda if the given value for an action is None, meaning you can get rid of that if callable(...) statement in update.

Now you simply need to add the decorator to your classes:

@generateActions
class Bullet(gameobject.GameObject):
    FRAME  = pygame.Rect(23, 5, 5, 5)
    STATES = config.Enum('IDLE', 'FIRED', 'MOVING', 'RESET')

    genactions = {
           STATES.IDLE   :  None         ,
           STATES.FIRED  : 'start_moving',
           STATES.MOVING : 'move'        ,
           STATES.RESET  : 'reset'       ,
          }
    ...

@generateActions
class ShipBullet(bullet.Bullet):
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Elegant solution, but I think a decorator is too error prone. It'll require loads of documentation and if the user still forgets it, the resulting bug will be extremely hard to trace. –  BoppreH Nov 25 '12 at 17:15
    
You could also do this with a metaclass that would eliminate the need to use an explicit decorator, but that would be even more magical. –  BrenBarn Nov 25 '12 at 19:43
    
@BoppreH If you rename the dict with the method names to something like genActions, forgetting to add the generator will result in an attribute error in update - where you can document what actions should contain and that there is a generator for creating the dict. –  l4mpi Nov 26 '12 at 8:05

Why not use python built-in mechanism for inheritance?

the instance function actions is the same for the derived class B. It get the the instance self when invoked and then it's like calling the function on the instance itself: Python's inheritance mechanism invokes B's method if it's there or fallbacks to A's implementation.

EDIT: l4mpi suggested pointed out that this will create the map each time, so I've change the action_map to be an attribute.

class A():
    def actions(self, action):
        if not hasattr(self, "actions_map"):
            self.actions_map = {
                   "IDLE"   : self.idle,
                   "FIRED"  : self.fired,
                   "MOVING" : self.move,
                   "RESET"  : self.reset,
                  }
        return self.actions_map[action]

    def idle(self):
        print "A idle"
        pass

    def fired(self):
        print "A fired"

    def move(self):
        print "A move"

    def reset(self):
        print "A reset"

class B(A):       
    def fired(self):
        print "B fired"


a = A()
b = B()

a.actions("FIRED")()
b.actions("FIRED")()
b.actions("MOVING")()

>> A fired
>> B fired
>> A move
share|improve this answer
    
But OP needs a table of actions in class A, mapping state to instance method. The problem is how to reference the actions in the base class. –  BoppreH Nov 25 '12 at 19:07
    
I've edited the answer, but the idea is the same - use python's inheritance instead of re-inventing the wheel. –  zenpoy Nov 26 '12 at 17:40
    
While the answer works, it's probably a bit slower than the version using a class or instance variable due to the overhead of the function call and the fact that you're generating the actions dict on every call to actions, which comes at the cost of n attribute lookups on self for n possible actions. –  l4mpi Nov 26 '12 at 20:46
    
@zenpoy actually I just tested it, on python 3.2 your version is about 150% slower than using a dictionary, and even slower than just using getattr. Also, the performance of your version should be proportional to the number of actions, while the getattr and class-dict versions should be constant. –  l4mpi Nov 26 '12 at 21:10
    
@l4mpi - see my edit. Will this solve all issues and still be a rather simple solution? –  zenpoy Nov 26 '12 at 23:11

Consider defining a typeclass for the game objects.

Here is my solution. I've simplified away all that's irrelevant to the point I'm making here.

class GameObjectClass(type):
    """A metaclass for all game objects"""

    @staticmethod
    def find(key, bases, dict):
        """Find a member in the class dict or any of the bases"""
        if key in dict:
            return dict[key]
        for b in bases:
            attr = getattr(b, key, None)
            if attr is not None:
                return attr
        return None

    def __new__(mcs, name, bases, dict):
        actions = GameObjectClass.find('actions', bases, dict)
        actionsResolved = {}
        for key, methodname in actions.items():
            if methodname is None:
                actionsResolved[key] = None
            else:
                actionsResolved[key] = GameObjectClass.find(methodname, bases, dict)
        dict['actionsResolved'] = actionsResolved
        return type.__new__(mcs, name, bases, dict)

class GameObject(object):

    # This class and all its subclasses will have
    # GameObjectClass for a metaclass
    __metaclass__ = GameObjectClass
    actions = dict()

    def __init__(self):
        self.state = None

    def update(self):
        if callable(self.__class__.actionsResolved[self.state]):
            self.__class__.actionsResolved[self.state](self)

class Bullet(GameObject):
    STATES = config.Enum('IDLE', 'FIRED', 'MOVING', 'RESET')
    def __init__(self):
        super(Bullet, self).__init__()
        self.state = self.__class__.STATES.IDLE
    # Here, strings are used. They will be resolved to
    # references to actual methods (actionsResolved),
    # and this resolution will happen only once
    # (when the game object class is defined)
    actions = {
        STATES.IDLE: None,
        STATES.FIRED: 'start_moving',
        STATES.MOVING: 'move',
        STATES.RESET: 'reset'
    }
    def start_moving(self):
        print "Bullet.start_moving"
    def move(self):
        print "Bullet.move"
    def reset(self):
        print "Bullet.reset"

class ShipBullet(Bullet):
    # This one will be correctly used for the FIRED state
    def start_moving(self):
        print "ShipBullet.start_moving"
share|improve this answer

Maybe I did not quite understand what you want to do ..

As I understand it, you have a class (A) in which mainly describes the function and class (B), which mainly describes the properties.

You want to call methods of the class A from an instance of class B?

Why not do something like this:

class Bullet(gameobject.GameObject):
    ...

class ShipBullet(bullet.Bullet):
    ABC = bullet.Bullet

    def somefunc(self):
        somekey = 5
        self.ABC.actions[somekey](self, *a, **kw)
        # or
        super(self.__class__, self).actions[somekey](self, *a, **kw)
        # or
        bullet.Bullet.actions[somekey](self, *a, **kw)

You need to add ref to instanse in action definitions like

def move(self, to_x, to_y): #as classic method
    ....
# or
def move(whom, to_x, to_y): #as "free-function"
    ....
share|improve this answer

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