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OK.

Background.

I was initially trying to make EF models along the lines of:

public class Person
{
    [Key]
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Guid PhoneID { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Phone> Phones { get; set; }
}

public class Org
{
    [Key]
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Guid PhoneID { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Phone> Phones { get; set; }
}

public class Phone
{
    [Key]
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public Guid EntityID { get; set; }


    [ForeignKey("EntityID")]
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("EntityID")]
    public virtual Org Org { get; set; }
}

But I now (mostly) realize that this causes an issue with Foreign Key relationship integrity in SQL Server. So to correct this, I altered the Phone class to:

public class Phone
{
    [Key]
    public Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public Guid? PersonID { get; set; }
    public Guid? OrgID { get; set; }


    [ForeignKey("PersonID")]
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("OrgID")]
    public virtual Org Org { get; set; }
}

Question.

How can I enforce / map a rule using modelbuilder / Fluent API to ensure a Phone object has either a PersonID or an OrgID?

Edit:

I do realise that this is creating a data integrity rule that I would be unable to do if I was designing the database in SQL Server, but to me it seems that EF has the potential flexibility to take database design to the next level.

I see EF (Code-First especially) as Microsoft's next big leap in their software development strategy. IMHO this is as big a leap as the introduction of .Net (Now there is a statement that should generate some debate!), that being moving the database design away from the database itself & integrating it in with the managed code.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to have different tables for user and org? You could use Table Per Hierarchy Inheritance to achive what you want, but in this case you will have one table for both entities –  Kirill Bestemyanov Nov 22 '12 at 5:18
    
I don't think so (but don't stop trying to convince me if you think it's better). The people table inherits from a user class in a separate security project that handles Membership, Roles, etc. –  PhantomRick Nov 22 '12 at 5:40
    
You could also create a custom validation attribute you would use to check whether PersonId (exclusive) or OrgID is not null. –  Pawel Nov 22 '12 at 6:58
    
I could, but it's a data integrity rule in the same way as a single non-null foreign key. You're talking about a business rule. –  PhantomRick Nov 22 '12 at 22:12

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