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Capture the domain till the ending characters $, \?, /, :. I need a regex that captures domian.com in all of these.

domain.com:3000
domain.com?pass=gas
domain.com/
domain.com
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1  
"How do I turn a screw with a hammer?" –  maček Nov 22 '12 at 5:43
    
@macek I built a URL / URI builder for javascript that takes arguments and constructs the URL from an object. I'm looking to create a regular expression that can take a string and create the object. stackoverflow.com/questions/13498417/build-urls-from-json –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 5:50
    
see my answer below. –  maček Nov 22 '12 at 5:57
    
Published my module here github.com/reggi/schemejs –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 7:32
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you actually have valid URLs, this will work:

var urls = [
    'http://domain.com:3000',
    'http://domain.com?pass=gas',
    'http://domain.com/',
    'http://domain.com'
];

for (x in urls) {
    var a = document.createElement('a');
    a.href = urls[x];
    console.log(a.hostname);
}

//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com

Note, using regex for this kind of thing is silly when the language you're using has other built-in methods.

Other properties available on A elements.

var a = document.createElement('a');
a.href = "http://domain.com:3000/path/to/something?query=string#fragment"

a.protocol   //=> http:
a.hostname   //=> domain.com
a.port       //=> 3000
a.pathname   //=> /path/to/something
a.search     //=> ?query=string
a.hash       //=> #fragment
a.host       //=> domain.com:3000

EDIT #2

Upon further consideration, I looked into the Node.js docs and found this little gem: url#parse

The code above can be rewritten as:

var url = require('url');

var urls = [
    'http://domain.com:3000',
    'http://domain.com?pass=gas',
    'http://domain.com/',
    'http://domain.com'
];

for (x in urls) {
    console.log(url.parse(urls[x]));
}

//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com
//=> domain.com

EDIT #1

See the revision history of this post if you'd like to see how to solve this problem using jsdom and nodejs

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javascript but I would really just like a regex –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 5:41
    
This would be great, but I'm working server-side. No doc =[. Might be a way to fake it. –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 5:59
    
Have you heard of jsdom? Also, you should've mentioned you were using something like node.js in the tags :P –  maček Nov 22 '12 at 6:03
    
I'm on it. Yes. It's late, Tags are gooooood. Thanks. –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 6:06
1  
@ThomasReggi, I discovered that nodejs has it's own url#parse method. Please see Edit #2 above. –  maček Nov 22 '12 at 7:58
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Since you're using node, just use the built-in url.parse() method; you want the resulting hostname property:

var url=require('url');
var urls = [
  'http://domain.com:3000',
  'http://domain.com?pass=gas',
  'http://domain.com/',
  'http://domain.com'
];

UPDATED:

urls.forEach(function(x) {
  console.log(url.parse(x).hostname);
});
share|improve this answer
    
returns { pathname: '0', path: '0', href: '0' } { pathname: '1', path: '1', href: '1' } { pathname: '2', path: '2', href: '2' } { pathname: '3', path: '3', href: '3' } –  ThomasReggi Nov 22 '12 at 7:31
    
Goofed-up test harness (copied from another answer), updated in my answer. Lesson: don't use for (...in...) to iterate over arrays. –  ebohlman Nov 22 '12 at 8:14
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/^((?:[a-z0-9-_]+\.)*[a-z0-9-_]+\.?)(?::([0-9]+))?(.*)$/i

matches are host, port, path

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