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I just wrote a simple calculator script in python, generally python should recognize the (-)minus,(*)multiplication,(/)divide sign by default but while considering this script it's fails to identify the signs. please leave your comments to clear me...

#! /usr/bin/python

print("1: ADDITION")
print("2: SUBTRACTION")
print("3: MULTIPLICATION")
print("4: DIVISION")

CHOICE = raw_input("Enter the Numbers:")

if CHOICE == "1":
    a = raw_input("Enter the value of a:")
    b = raw_input("Enter the value of b:")
    c = a + b
    print c

elif CHOICE == "2":
    a = raw_input("Enter the value of a:")
    b = raw_input("Enter the value of b:")
    c = a - b
    print c

elif CHOICE == "3":
    a = raw_input("Enter the value of a:")
    b = raw_input("Enter the value of b:")
    c = a * b
    print c

elif CHOICE == "4":
    a = raw_input("Enter the value of a:")
    b = raw_input("Enter the value of b:")
    c = a / b
    print c

else: 
 print "Invalid Number"
 print "\n"
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by lanzz, Andy Hayden, interjay, Maerlyn, thkala Nov 22 '12 at 10:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I don't understand the question. You don't process signs in this script, you process numbers. (Although there is a separate issue to do with the types of a and b.) –  Daniel Roseman Nov 22 '12 at 9:09
1  
By the way, it's division. –  Tim Pietzcker Nov 22 '12 at 9:17

3 Answers 3

When you get the input it is a string. The + operator is defined for strings, which is why it works but the others don't. I suggest using a helper function to safely get an integer (if you are doing integer arithmetic).

def get_int(prompt):
    while True:
        try:
            return int(raw_input(prompt))
        except ValueError, e:
            print "Invalid input"

a = get_int("Enter the value of a: ")
share|improve this answer

You need to change your inputs, strings to integer or float. Since, there is division you are better change it to float.

a=int(raw_input("Enter the value of a:"))
a=float(raw_input("Enter the value of a:"))
share|improve this answer

Billwild said u should change to make your variables integers. But why not float. It is not important if it is integer or float it must be number type. Raw_input takes any input like string.

a=float(raw_input('Enter the value of a: '))

Or for Tim's aproach

def get_float(prompt):
    while True:
        try:
            return float(raw_input(prompt))
        except ValueError, e:
            print "Invalid input"

a = get_float("Enter the value of a: ")

You can always convert result to float or to int or back. It is just matter what kind of calculator u are programming.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right - Since there is division it is better if you convert to float. –  billwild Nov 22 '12 at 9:38

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