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I am making a photomosaic app, a simple solution is to scan though bitmap to parition the bitmap into small squares and replace each with small images. But in order to increase the quality of the resulting image, I want to scan the bitmap from the center instead of from the top left. Is there any existing algorithm to solve that?

for example:

In traditional method, we scan 2-D array from topleft:

1  2  3  4

5  6  7  8

9  10 11 12

13 14 15 16

But I want to scan from center to the border, spirally :

16 15 14 13

5  4  3  12

6  1  2  11

7  8  9  10
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What should be the linear scan sequence? Should it be 10,11,7,6,5,9,13,14,15,16,12,8,4,3,2,1 ? –  Deep Nov 22 '12 at 10:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
bool between(int x, int low, int high) {
  return low <= x && x <= high;
}

// we use this constant array to help tweaking the (row,col) coordinate
const int D[4][2] = {
  {0, 1},   // 0 - right
  {1, 0},   // 1 - down
  {0, -1},  // 2 - left
  {-1, 0}   // 3 - up
};

int a[n][n]; // suppose the array is n times n in size
int row = 0, col = 0, dir = 0; // initial direction is "0 - right"

for (int m = n*n; m >= 1; m--) {
  a[row][col] = m;

  int old_row = row, old_col = col;  // remember current coordinate

  row += D[dir][0];
  col += D[dir][1];

  if (!(between(row,0,n-1) && between(col,0,n-1))) { // have to move back
    // move back
    row = old_row;
    col = old_col;

    // change direction
    dir++;
    dir %= 4;

    // move again
    row += D[dir][0];
    col += D[dir][1];
  }
}
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thanks very much! –  Tyler Shao Nov 22 '12 at 20:11
    
@user1833006 If you feel it's ok, please consider accept this as the answer by clicking the check mark on the left. Thx. :-) –  Xiao Jia Nov 23 '12 at 2:20

One possibility to solve this, is to think about drawing the spiral backwards.

You start at point (0,0) then go to (0, y) -> (x,y) -> (x, 0) -> (1, 0). What remains is a smaller rectangle. You do that as long as your height/width of the remaining is bigger than 2.

Now you have a rectangle with size (x,2) or (2,y) which is the center rectangle to start draw with. For simplicity, I assume you have a rectangle of size (x,2). You start in left bottom of it. Drawing x steps to the right, then drawing 1 up. Then you increase your steps of your width or height.

The question is now, how do you get the first rectangle with size (x,2)? Let's say you have a picture with size (w,h) with w > h then your first rectangle is (w-h+2,2) and the coordinate to start is (w/2-(w-h+2)/2, h/2).

Example: Given a rectangle w=8, h=4. The center rectangle is w=6, h=2. And you start at position (1,2).

Drawing will be: 6 to the right, 1 up, 6 left, 2 down, 7 right, 3 up, 7 left, done.

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thanks very much! –  Tyler Shao Nov 22 '12 at 20:10

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