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I want to change the indexing of array for example. I have an array

$a = array("a","e","i","o","u");
echo $a[0]; //output a

It means this array has index (0,1,2,3,4)

Now I want to start my array from index 100 instead 0

Means array with index (100,200,300,400,500)

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1  
If this array is getting created dynamically,then you can easily assign the index you want in a loop. –  techie_28 Nov 22 '12 at 9:57
    
Is there any system to this? Is is always a limited number of values? Is it dynamic? Can't you just type it by hand? –  deceze Nov 22 '12 at 9:58
3  
Is there an actual valid reason why you'd want this kind of behaviour? –  N.B. Nov 22 '12 at 10:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to declare an array that way you should do:

$array = array(100 => 'a', 200 => 'b', 300 => 'c', 400 => 'd', 500 => 'e');

Note that if you add a new element to the $array in the shorter way ($array[] = 'f') the key assigned will be 501.

If you want to convert regular array indexes to hundreds-based ones you can do this:

$temp = array();
foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
    $temp[(($key + 1) * 100)] = $value;
}
$array = $temp;

But perhaps you don't really need to convert no array and instead access your current one this way:

$i = $hundredBasedIndex / 100 - 1;
echo $array[$i];
// or directly
echo $array[($hundredBasedIndex / 100 - 1)];
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Thanks Jackflash for your answer.This is the first time when I asked question on internet. You really gave your answers in very right manner and explaining all the things. Thanks!!! :) –  Bhuvnesh Gupta Nov 23 '12 at 6:19
    
You're welcome, my friend! :) –  jackflash Nov 23 '12 at 7:25

Other solution:

$a = array_combine(array(100, 200, 300, 400, 500), $a);
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1  
+1 for neatness –  lserni Nov 22 '12 at 21:52
    
Thanks m4t1t0 for giving function solution... :) –  Bhuvnesh Gupta Nov 23 '12 at 6:22
    
@BhuvneshGupta you're welcome! –  m4t1t0 Nov 23 '12 at 7:17
    
@m4t1t0 Nice point! +1 –  jackflash Nov 23 '12 at 7:26

You could simply define a starting index and iterate over the array swapping the indexes. Something like this -

$oldArray = array("a","e","i","o","u");  
$newArray = array();
$startIndex = 100;

foreach($oldArray AS $key => $value){
  $newArray[$startIndex] = $value;
  startIndex += 100;
}
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1  
except that startIndex has to be incremented by 100. –  lserni Nov 22 '12 at 21:54
    
@ise - oops! Thanks for that! How embarrassing ;-) I'm still confused about the logic behind this behavior... I hope the OP has a justified reason to do this... –  Lix Nov 22 '12 at 21:58

just make an associative array with keys as indexes you want. for example :

$myArray = array(100=>"a",200=>"e",300=>"i",400=>"o",500=>"u");

then you call the values like:

echo $myArray[100] ;

note: do not put '100'=>"a" instead of 100=>"a"

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$key = array(100, 200, 300, 400, 500);

$b = array_combine($key, $a);

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Simply change your array Like this:

$a = array(100 => "a", 200 => "e", 300 => "i", 400 => "o", 500 => "u");
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Just create the array that way.

$myarray = array(
    100 => 'a',
    200 => 'b',
);

If you already have an array with that order, and want to multiply the keys by 100, you can do so in a loop (there are other ways, but...):

$a = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e');

$newarray = array();
foreach($a as $key => $value)
    $newarray[100*($key+1)] = $value;
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