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Possible Duplicate:
Java calling methods from restricted layer

Lest say i have this:

package org.service;
import org.core;

public class Service()
{
    public void init()
    {
        Core core = new Core();
        core.callbackFunction();
    }
    public void support()
    {
         ...
    }
}

package org.core
public class Core()
{
    public void callbackFunction()
    {
        ...
    }

    public void useSerivice()
    {
        ...
    }
}
  • Service imports Core
  • Core must not import Service

when init() method from Service is called it calls core.callbackFunction() method.

Is it possible to provide as an argument for callbackFunction a reference to a Service method that Core can then trigger when he is executing his support() method.

For instance:

when support() method from Core is called it triggers calling methods from Service. The list of methods that are called are provided from Service while calling Core's callbackFunction() method.

I hope my question is understandable.

Im using Spring and Seam Fw.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by casperOne Nov 23 '12 at 12:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This is the same question as this: stackoverflow.com/questions/13508684/… –  Akber Choudhry Nov 22 '12 at 10:48
    
@akberc It appears to be related, but I wouldn't say it was the same question. –  Duncan Nov 22 '12 at 10:51

1 Answer 1

How about the design below? Your implementation of bar() in the Service class could call other methods as needed.

public interface Foo {
    void bar();
}

public class Service implements Foo {
    public void init() {
        Core core = new Core();
        core.callbackFunction(this);
    }

    @Override
    public bar() {
        // impl here
    }
}

public class Core() {

    private Foo foo;

    public void callbackFunction(Foo foo) {
        this.foo = foo;
    }

    public void useService() {
        if (foo != null) {
            foo.bar();
        } else {
            // Uh-oh.
        }
    }
}

I would also strongly recommend the Foo instance is passed in the constructor of the Core class to avoid the need for the if (foo != null) test.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not very clear from the original post when Core.useService() would be called, but this looks like a decent generic solution. I would change one thing: Service implementing Foo is a broken encapsulation that you can fix by using an instance of an inner class inside Service instead of "this" (e.g. anonymous but doesn't have to be). –  Dave Syer Nov 23 '12 at 12:43
    
@DaveSyer How does it break encapsulation? As far as Core is concerned, it just receives a Foo regardless of whether its an inner class or the entirety of Service. Or have I misunderstood encapsulation (quite possible!)? –  Duncan Nov 23 '12 at 15:53
    
It's not a big deal. Consider the business clients of Service - do they really need Service to be a Foo (the only reason it is in your code is to satisfy a low level internal dependency)? –  Dave Syer Nov 23 '12 at 17:43

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