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I am iterating through a database and want to add the variable value of key "number" to a list x, only if this key exists. There are some documents where there is no key "number".

Inside mongo I would use the $exist, but I don't know how to do it in python. I tried this but it doesn't work...

for i in database:
    try:
        x.append(i["number"])
    except NameError:
        break

This doesn't work, and I am sure there is a more elegant way...

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i.has_key('number') check should do it –  avasal Nov 22 '12 at 11:01
1  
@avasal 'key' in obj is the preferred method, and .has_key has gone the way of the dodo in 3.x –  Jon Clements Nov 22 '12 at 11:07
    
This is a EAFP vs. LBYL decision - in Python, you usually try something and catch an exception... –  glglgl Nov 22 '12 at 11:12
    
@Julia You already heard about the quality of a statement like "doesn't work"? –  glglgl Nov 22 '12 at 11:13
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The in operator is the canonical way to test existence of a key in a container:

for i in database:
    if "number" in i:
        x.append(i["number"])
share|improve this answer
1  
No, it works just fine and is documented; try it. In fact, "number" in i.keys() is wrong because it forces a linear scan over dict keys, while "number" in i performs an O(1) lookup. –  user4815162342 Nov 22 '12 at 11:10
    
@juankysmith Be careful about claims taht something is wrong. Better check it beforehand... –  glglgl Nov 22 '12 at 11:14
2  
@glglgl Playing devil's advocate - if using Python 3.x, then .keys() is a set like object and not a list, so 'number' in d.keys() won't perform a linear scan, but it's definitely nowhere near good practice –  Jon Clements Nov 22 '12 at 11:21
    
ok, thank you and sorry –  juankysmith Nov 22 '12 at 11:22
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Are you effectively writing - the try/append/except is making it a bit confusing...

x = [i['number'] for i in database if 'number' in i]
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You are close to what you want: a non-existing key gives no NameError, but a KeyError.

So

for i in database:
    try:
        x.append(i["number"])
    except KeyError:
        continue

should do what you want.

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add comment

Your actual code is near to what you want. You only have to use the continue instead of break in the except clause. Like so

for i in database:
    try:
        x.append(i["number"])
    except NameError:
        continue
share|improve this answer
    
If there's nothing else in the loop, pass will work just as well. –  Blckknght Nov 22 '12 at 11:17
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