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I was wondering if it was possible, and what was the best way to read cells from an array with threads in CUDA. To simplify what I mean this is an example :

I have an array : {1,2,3,4,5,6,...} and I would like each threads to read n cells of my array depending mainly of its size.

I have been trying a few things, but it seems not to work, so if anyone could point out a (right) way to do it, that would be great.

Thank you.

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How large is your array? Depending on the size of the array you could even start one thread per item and not worry about it. –  Tudor Nov 22 '12 at 11:22
    
That's the problem, I can't use one item per thread because the threads have to look at the n next numbers. –  Anoracx Nov 22 '12 at 11:28
    
How big is n? –  harrism Nov 22 '12 at 22:59
    
it can go up to 2000k –  Anoracx Nov 23 '12 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

Generally you want contiguous threads to read contiguous array indices. Doing so results in "coalesced" memory transactions. The simple way to think of it is that if 32 threads are running physically in parallel, and they all do a load, then if all 32 loads fall into the same cache line, then a single memory access can be performed to fill the cache line, rather than 32 separate ones.

So what you want to do is have each thread access n cells that are strided by the number of threads, like this (assuming input data is in the float array data).

int idx = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
int stride = blockDim.x * gridDim.x;
for (int i = idx; i < numElements; i += stride) {
  float element = data[i];
  process(element);
}

If your algorithm requires that each thread reads n contiguous data elements, then you are going to incur non-coalesced loads, which will be much more expensive. In this case, I would consider re-designing the algorithm so this type of access is not required.

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Thank you for your reply, but I have been looking at this for a few minutes now, but, I don't really get how i+=stride will work. If we need to add N numbers with 2 threads (or look at N numbers) in a fixed size array it's gonna add 0+2+4+n instead of 0+1+2+n or did I missed something ? –  Anoracx Nov 23 '12 at 13:52
    
but unfortunately, I need to read n contiguous data elements, I believe that a lot of algorithms are doing that such as fast string searching. Because the algorithm I'am using cannot be redesigned. I'am actually looking to see if this problem has been resolved somehow. –  Anoracx Nov 23 '12 at 14:36
    
A stride of 2000 elements between threads is always going to result in the maximum memory transactions possible, maximum cache misses, etc. My suggestion is to process each group of 2000 elements with one warp, rather than one thread. –  harrism Nov 29 '12 at 23:32
    
So, with 2000k elements it would be better divide that array, divided it in a chunks, send chucks of n elements to my cuda card, (where n is a multiple of 32) and process them in warp ? –  Anoracx Dec 4 '12 at 10:05

You need to:

the threads have to look at the n next numbers

So you can use:

#define N 2
#define NTHREAD 1024
#define ARRAYSIZE N*NTHREAD

// develop the kernel as:
__global__ void accessArray(int *array){
    int tid = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    int startId = tid*N;

    // access thread's stride
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++){
        array[startId+i]=tid;
    }
}
// call the kernel by:
accessArray<<<NTHREAD/256, 256>>>(d_array);

dump out the array and check whether it is how you want your thread work or not.

Full code:

#include <cuda.h>
#include <stdio.h>


#define N 2
#define NTHREAD 1024
#define ARRAYSIZE N*NTHREAD

// develop the kernel as:
__global__ void accessArray(int *array){
    int tid = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    int startId = tid*N;

    // access thread's stride
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++){
        array[startId+i]=tid;
    }
}

int  main()
{
    int h_array[ARRAYSIZE];
    int *d_array;
    size_t memsize= ARRAYSIZE * sizeof(float);

    for (int i=0; i< ARRAYSIZE; i++) {
        h_array[i] = 0;
    }

    cudaMalloc(&d_array, memsize);
    cudaMemcpy(d_array, h_array, memsize,  cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    accessArray<<<NTHREAD/256, 256>>>(d_array);
    cudaMemcpy(h_array, d_array, memsize,  cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    for (int i=0; i<ARRAYSIZE; i++)
        printf("A[%d] => %d\n",i,h_array[i]);

    cudaFree(d_array);
}
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1  
This is the obvious approach. The reason I didn't write it this way in my answer is because it will be very inefficient. You will achieve approximately 1/32 of the hardware's available memory bandwidth. –  harrism Nov 22 '12 at 23:02
    
You are definitely right. –  ahmad Nov 23 '12 at 7:12
    
Why will this code be so inefficient ? –  Anoracx Nov 23 '12 at 10:48
    
@Anoracx Simply, for the warping execution. Neighbor threads (every 32 thread) are execute in lock-step using a warp. Memory access of the threads in a warp can be merged into one memory transaction if they are accessing the same memory block (referred to as memory access coalescing). When the N is large, this code do not exploit the memory access coalescing and threads access to different blocks leading to many memory accesses (downgrading the performance). –  ahmad Nov 23 '12 at 11:18
    
So, basically your block size should always be divisible by 32 ? –  Anoracx Nov 23 '12 at 11:27

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