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I have a layered application with the following projects:

  • DAL (using EntityFramework with repositories)
  • DAL.Model (contains the entities, and is referenced by all the others)
  • Services
  • UI (in wpf)

The base repository looks like this:

public abstract class RepositoryBase<T> where T : class
{
    private readonly MyContext context;
    private readonly IDbSet<T> dbSet;

    protected RepositoryBase(MyContext dataContext)
    {
        context = dataContext;
        dbSet = context.Set<T>();
    }

    protected MyContext Context
    {
        get { return context; }
    }

    **And a series of virtual methods for Add, Delete, etc.
}

All repositories extend this one, such as:

public class MarketRepository : RepositoryBase<Market>
{
    public MarketRepository(MyContext dataContext) : base(dataContext)
    {

    }

    public IEnumerable<Market> GetAllMarkets()
    {
        return this.Context.Markets.ToList<Market>();
    }
}

The services look like this:

public class MarketService
{
    IMarketRepository _marketRepository;

    public MarketService(IMarketRepository marketRepository)
    {
        _marketRepository = marketRepository;
    }

    public IEnumerable<Market> GetAllMarkets()
    {
        return _marketRepository.GetAllMarkets();
    }
}

What I would like to achieve is that the UI layer would only have a reference to the Services layer, the Services layer only with the DAL layer (and all of them to Model, where the entities live) using DI (right now I'm using Unity).

The problem is, in my container in the UI I only want to do this

unity.RegisterType<IMarketService, MarketService>();

and not have to do it as well for the repositories, because then the UI layer would have a dependency on the DAL layer.

I thought about adding a parameterless constructor to the Service classes, like:

public MarketService() : this(new MarketRepository(*What would I put here?)) { }

but then I'm loosing the abstraction that the interface gives, and also I don't know what to do with the MyContext that the repository needs as a parameter; if I pass a new one, then I need to reference the DAL.

Should I change my repositories to create a new MyContext in the constructor, rather than getting it as a parameter?

How can I refactor my architecture to make it work properly and with minimal dependencies?

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why are you creating repository ? DbSet is already a repository. –  remi bourgarel Nov 23 '12 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, I belive it is up to the bootstrapper to configure dependencies, in the higher level of the application. As it is usually the UI project, if it needs to reference other assemblies, so be it. If you do not like your UI project managing that, than create a bootstrapper project responsable for getting your app running and separete your UI classes in another one.

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I'd prefer to avoid having one more extra project just to handle that... But I agree, if I don't find any other way I'll add all the references to the UI as a last resource. Still there must be a better way to do what I exposed. –  chuwik Nov 22 '12 at 14:10
1  
I don't think there's a "better way" here. As Arthur said, you have to either create an independent project to manage dependency wiring, or let one of the existing layers do it all. Most of the time, the recommended approach (including by people who have written entire books on the subject - see blog.ploeh.dk/2011/07/28/CompositionRoot.aspx) is to put that logic in an application entry point, which often amounts to the presentation layer. –  guillaume31 Nov 22 '12 at 16:01
    
Thanks guillaume31, that's what I'll go with! –  chuwik Nov 27 '12 at 10:52

Your IoC container should support Dependency Injection using a string from an external configuration file. This way you are not hardcoding the mapping. Structuremap does this quite well, so I am sure other IoCs will.

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Yes, I could set it up in app.config. But still, I would need the UI to reference the DAL assembly, which is what I'm trying to avoid. –  chuwik Nov 22 '12 at 14:07
    
It don't have to be an app.config. You can define a configuration approach. There will always be somewhere that has to do the glue work. People nowadays are getting too caught up in best practices. In fact, it actually hinders people's development progress. –  SolidRegardless Nov 22 '12 at 15:17

Adding external dependenices as a parameter when creating an instance is the way to go.
I think you should make yourself more familiar with the different ways to configure Unity, so that the dependencies are resolved.
Could you elaborate why you are creating a repository when using a dependency injection framework?

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I'm creating the repository in the data access layer as an abstraction for accessing data; the services use them to manipulate the data. That way I can mock and test the repositories, and change it's implementation with less hassle. –  chuwik Nov 22 '12 at 14:31

When configuring DI, you should follow the same pattern - UI bootstrapper initializes Services, Services initialize DAL. (With autofac or ninject you could achiece this using modules. With unity you should emulate modules).

In pseudocode something like

//ui
void UILayer.ConfigureUnity(unity)
{
    ServiceLayer.ConfigureUnity(unity)
}
//services
void ServiceLayer.ConfigureUnity(unity)
{
    DAL.ConfigureUnity(unity)
    unity.RegisterType<IMarketService, MarketService>();

}
//dal
void DAL.ConfigureUnity(unity)
{
    unity.RegisterType<IMarketRepository, MarketRespository>();
    unity.RegisterType<MyContext, MyContext>(); //not sure exact syntax - just register type for 'new Type()' activator.
}
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