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I have a Windows service that reads emails from a queue in a database using Entity Framework 5, and then sends them to an SMTP server using a System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient

It's my first attempt at writing an F# application, I'm from a C# background. How could it be improved to be more functional and/or take fuller advantage of the features of F#? Could you explain what the advantages would be to making these changes?

The worker is constructed by the service host, it's work function is called when the service starts and ContinueWorking is set to false when the service is stopped.

namespace EmailService

open log4net

open System
open System.Linq
open System.Net.Mail

open EmailService.Context

type Worker(contextFactory: EmailContextFactory, mailClient: ISmtpClient, logger: ILog) =

    let MapToMessage(email : Email) =
        let message = new MailMessage()
        message.Sender <- new MailAddress(email.From)
        message.From <- new MailAddress(email.From)
        message.Subject <- email.Subject
        message.Body <- email.Body
        message.IsBodyHtml <- email.IsBodyHtml
        message.To.Add(email.To)
        (email, message)

    member val ContinueWorking = true with get, set
    member this.Work() = 
        logger.Info "Starting work"

        let mutable unsentEmails = Array.empty<Email>
        while this.ContinueWorking do

            use context = contextFactory.GetEntities()
            while this.ContinueWorking && Array.isEmpty unsentEmails do
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000)
                unsentEmails <- query { for q in context.QueueItems do
                                           where (q.Error = null)
                                           select q.Email }
                                |> query.Take(10)
                                |> query.toArray

            Array.map MapToMessage unsentEmails
                |> Array.iter (fun (email, message) -> 
                    try
                        mailClient.SendMail(message)
                        email.DateSent <- new Nullable<DateTime>(DateTime.UtcNow)
                        context.QueueItems.Remove(email.QueueItem) |> ignore
                    with
                        | ex -> 
                            logger.Error(ex)
                            email.QueueItem.Error <- ex.ToString())

            context.SaveChanges() |> ignore
            logger.Info (sprintf "Sent %d emails" unsentEmails.Length)



        logger.Info "Work complete"
share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Lee, mydogisbox, Shawn Chin, rolve, Robin Nov 22 '12 at 15:57

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2  
This question belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Lee Nov 22 '12 at 12:22
    
Should I delete it and repost it there? –  Joe Taylor Nov 22 '12 at 13:17
    
No, then people would miss out on Tomas useful answer... –  Robert Jeppesen Nov 22 '12 at 20:59
1  
+1 Great question! –  Jon Harrop Nov 23 '12 at 19:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Work method creates a long-running process that eventually needs to be stopped. A better way to represent this in F# would be to use asynchronous workflows - an asynchronous workflow can be suspended without blocking thread (so you do not need Thread.Sleep) and it can be easily cancelled using CancellationToken.

Otherwise, your code looks good to me. I did some minor changes (like use take in the F# query syntax, which is a nice little feature).

I also do not quite understand why your code has two nested while loops. Is that necessary? If no, I think you could write something like:

member this.Work() = async {
    logger.Info "Starting work"
    while true do
        do! Async.Sleep(1000)
        use context = contextFactory.GetEntities()
        let unsentEmails =
          query { for q in context.QueueItems do
                  where (q.Error = null)
                  select q.Email 
                  take 10 }
        unsentEmails
        |> Array.map MapToMessage 
        |> Array.iter (fun (email, message) -> 
                try
                    mailClient.SendMail(message)
                    email.DateSent <- new Nullable<DateTime>(DateTime.UtcNow)
                    context.QueueItems.Remove(email.QueueItem) |> ignore
                with ex ->
                     logger.Error(ex)
                     email.QueueItem.Error <- ex.ToString())
        context.SaveChanges() |> ignore
        logger.Info (sprintf "Sent %d emails" unsentEmails.Length)
    logger.Info "Work complete" }

To start the process (and to stop it later), you would write something like:

// Start the work
let cts = new CancellationTokenSource()
Async.Start(worker.Work(), cts.Token)

// Stop the worker
cts.Cancel()
share|improve this answer
    
That's brilliant, thanks a lot for your input. The inner loop isn't necessary, it was a hangover from an earlier implementation that only processed one email at a time; the inner loop was to wait until there was an email in the queue. It's particularly cool that these workflows support cancellation automatically, I had to do a bit of reading to understand how calling cts.Cancel() causes the loop to exist without any explicit checks. –  Joe Taylor Nov 22 '12 at 14:12
    
@popformula Yes, this is a very useful feature (that you do not get even in C# 5 async). It essentially inserts checks at any binding point - in this example just around the do! Async.Sleep(..) line, so it will not kill processing in any dangerous state (like in the middle of sending an email). –  Tomas Petricek Nov 22 '12 at 14:22

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