Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a server with an open port which receives between 50 and 1000 messages per second. By message I mean that a single line of text is sent.

Essentially we want to record these messages in a file which will be processed every hour (or x minutes).

I have created a bash script (see below) which runs in the background and it works except when I kill the socat process (so I can take the file for processing and it can start a new file) we get part of a message, plus I am sure we are losing messages during the split second that socat is down.

DELAY="3600"
while true
do  
    NEXT_STOP=`date +%s --date "$DELAY second"`
    (
        while [ "$(date +%s)" -lt "$NEXT_STOP" ]
        do
            killall socat
            socat -u TCP-LISTEN:6116,reuseaddr,keepalive,rcvbuf=131071,reuseaddr OPEN:/var/ais/out_v4.txt,creat,append
        done
    ) & sleep $DELAY ; killall socat

    mv /var/ais/out_v4.txt "/var/ais/_socat_received/"$(date +"%Y-%m-%d-%T")"__out_v4.txt"
done

Is there a way to:

  1. Get socat to rotate its output file without killing the process
  2. Or can we purge the content of the file whilst SOCAT is writing to it. e.g. cut the first 10000 lines into another file, so the output file remains a manageable size?

Many thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
On further research I suspect the solution lies with using the EXEC function rather than open. So this test writes to the file but again it doesnt rotate (i.e. create a new file every second).socat -u TCP-LISTEN:124567 EXEC:"tee -a /root/socat_out_{$(date +"%Y-%m-%d-%T")}.txt" –  user1844937 Nov 22 '12 at 16:05
    
Is that one message per TCP connection, or do you want it to rotate halfway through handling a bundle of messages from a single connection? The latter's more fiddly. The former shouldn't be so hard: set up socat as a forking server, invoking a script. The script will just cat stdin to a file. When you want to change the file written to, write a new script that contains the new filename, and mv it on top of the old script. The listening socat will seamlessly hand over connections to be dumped in the new file. Make sure to use O_APPEND etc. –  Nicholas Wilson Nov 22 '12 at 16:06
    
Hi Nicholas, the server sending the messages is persistent so it stays connected for hours / days at a time (sending millions of messages), hence we need to rotate files part way through. Any ideas? –  user1844937 Nov 22 '12 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For anyone interested the final solution looks like the following, the key difference to Nicholas solution below is that I needed to grep the PID of the socat process rather than use $?:

#!/bin/bash
DELAY=600
SOCAT_PID=$(/bin/ps -eo pid,args | grep "socat -u TCP-LISTEN:12456" | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $1 }')

while `kill -0 $SOCAT_PID`
do  
  touch /var/ais/out.txt
  NEXT_STOP=`date +%s --date "$DELAY second"`
  while  `kill -0 $SOCAT_PID` && [ "$(date +%s)" -lt "$NEXT_STOP" ]
  do
    head -q - >> /var/ais/out.txt
  done
  mv /var/ais/out.txt "/var/ais/_socat_received/"$(date +"%Y-%m-%d-%T")"__out.txt"
done

In addition adding the start script within an infinite while loop so that when the client disconnects we restart socat and wait for the next connection attempt:

while true
do
socat -u TCP-LISTEN:12456,keepalive,reuseaddr,rcvbuf=131071 STDOUT | /var/ais/socat_write.sh
done
share|improve this answer

Not so obvious! socat doesn't have any options for changing what it does with the connection halfway through. That means you'll have to be a little bit sneaky. Use socat with the output as STDOUT, and pipe to this script:

#!/bin/bash
rv=0
while [ $rv -lt 1 ]
do  
  NEXT_STOP=`date +%s --date "$DELAY second"`
  while [ "$(date +%s)" -lt "$NEXT_STOP" ] && [ $rv -lt 1 ]
  do
    head -q - >> /var/ais/out_v4.txt
    rv=$?
  done
  mv /var/ais/out_v4.txt "/var/ais/_socat_received/"$(date +"%Y-%m-%d-%T")"__out_v4.txt"
done

Totally untested, but looks reasonable?

socat -u TCP-LISTEN:6116,reuseaddr,keepalive,rcvbuf=131071,reuseaddr STDOUT | ./thescript.sh
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, head's return value is useless. As a hack, you could check that the size of /var/ais/out_v4.txt grew, and if not, exit. There must be a neater way... Also, with a subshell, you can put the socat line in the same script. –  Nicholas Wilson Nov 22 '12 at 17:07
    
Your solutions works from the point that it does do the rotation perfectly, there is a slight issue with the pipe buffering collecting 4kb before sending but that I can fix. I assume in your comment you mean exit if the file hasnt changes size because when the client (server sending messages) terminates our server is still connected and the client can't re-connect to send more messages. Presumably this is because the script is still looping? –  user1844937 Nov 22 '12 at 17:27
    
Within the script how would I get the pid of the socat script? whilst everything is running doing a ps -A | grep socat returns 23218 pts/0 00:00:00 socat 23219 pts/0 00:00:00 socat_write.sh and when the client breaks the connection pid 23218 is terminated so in the script it could loop while pid 23218 is running? I assume that is what rv=$? is trying but $?=0 and $$=23219 –  user1844937 Nov 22 '12 at 18:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.