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So, a colleague introduced me to the publish/subscribe pattern (in JS/jQuery), but I'm having a hard time getting to grips with why one would use this pattern over 'normal' JavaScript/jQuery.

For example, previously I had the following code...

$container.on('click', '.remove_order', function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    var orders = $(this).parents('form:first').find('div.order');
    if (orders.length > 2) {
        orders.last().remove();
    }
});

And I could see the merit of doing this instead, for example...

removeOrder = function(orders) {
    if (orders.length > 2) {
        orders.last().remove();
    }
}

$container.on('click', '.remove_order', function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    removeOrder($(this).parents('form:first').find('div.order'));
});

Because it introduces the ability to re-use the removeOrder functionality for different events etc.

But why would you decide to implement the publish/subscribe pattern and go to the following lengths, if it does the same thing? (FYI, I used jQuery tiny pub/sub)

removeOrder = function(e, orders) {
    if (orders.length > 2) {
        orders.last().remove();
    }
}

$.subscribe('iquery/action/remove-order', removeOrder);

$container.on('click', '.remove_order', function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $.publish('iquery/action/remove-order', $(this).parents('form:first').find('div.order'));
});

I've read about the pattern for sure, but I just can't imagine why this would ever be necessary. The tutorials I've seen that explain how to implement this pattern only cover just as basic examples as my own.

I imagine that the pub/sub's usefulness would make itself apparent in a more complex application, but I can't imagine one. I'm afraid that I am completely missing the point; but I'd like to know the point if there is one!

Could you explain succinctly why and in what situations this pattern is advantageous? Is it worth using the pub/sub pattern for code snippets like my examples above?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 75 down vote accepted

It’s all about loose coupling and single responsibility, which goes hand to hand with MV* (MVC/MVP/MVVM) patterns in JavaScript which are very modern in the last few years.

Loose coupling is an Object-oriented principle in which each component of the system knows it’s responsibility and don’t care about the other components (or at least tries to not care about them as much as possible). Loosing coupling is a good thing because you can easily reuse the different modules. You’re not coupled with the interfaces of other modules. Using publish/subscribe you’re only coupled with the publish/subscribe interface which is not a big deal – just two methods. So if you decide to reuse a module in different project you can just copy and paste it and it’ll probably work or at least you won’t need much effort to make it work.

As talking about loose coupling we should mention the separation of concerns. If you’re building an application using MV* architectural pattern you have always a Model(s) and a View(s). The Model is the business part of the application. You can reuse it in different applications, so it’s not a good idea to couple it with the View of a single application, where you want to show it, because usually in the different applications you have different views. So it’s a good idea to use publish/subscribe for the Model-View communication. When your Model changes it publish an event, the View catch it and update itself. You don’t have any overhead from the publish/subscribe, it helps you for the decoupling. In the same manner you can keep your application logic into the Controller for example (MVVM, MVP it’s not exactly a Controller) and keep the View as simple as possible. When your View changes (or the user click on something, for example) it just publish a new event, the Controller catch it and decides what to do. If you are familiar with the MVC pattern or with MVVM in the Microsoft technologies (WPF/Silverlight) you can think for the publish/subscribe like the Observer pattern. This approach is used in frameworks like Backbone.js, Knockout.js (MVVM).

Here is an example:

//Model
function Book(name, isbn) {
    this.name = name;
    this.isbn = isbn;
}

function BookCollection(books) {
    this.books = books;
}

BookCollection.prototype.addBook = function (book) {
    this.books.push(book);
    $.publish('book-added', book);
    return book;
}

BookCollection.prototype.removeBook = function (book) {
   var removed;
   if (typeof book === 'number') {
       removed = this.books.splice(book, 1);
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < this.books.length; i += 1) {
      if (this.books[i] === book) {
          removed = this.books.splice(i, 1);
      }
   }
   $.publish('book-removed', removed);
   return removed;
}

//View
var BookListView = (function () {

   function removeBook(book) {
      $('#' + book.isbn).remove();
   }

   function addBook(book) {
      $('#bookList').append('<div id="' + book.isbn + '">' + book.name + '</div>');
   }

   return {
      init: function () {
         $.subscribe('book-removed', removeBook);
         $.subscribe('book-aded', addBook);
      }
   }
}());

Another example. If you don’t like the MV* approach you can use something a little different (there’s an intersection between the one I’ll describe next and the last mentioned). Just structure your application in different modules. For example look at Twitter.

Twitter Modules

If you look at the interface you simply have different boxes. You can think of each box as different module. For example you can post a tweet. This action requires update of few modules. Firstly it has to update your profile data (upper left box) but it also has to update your timeline. Of course, you can keep references to both modules and update them separately using their public interface but it’s easier (and better) to just publish an event. This will make the modification of your application easier because of loosing coupling. If you develop new module which depends on new tweets you can just subscribe to the “publish-tweet” event and handle it. This approach is very useful and can make your application very decoupled. You can reuse your modules very easy.

Here is a basic example of the last approach (this is not original twitter code it’s just a sample by me):

var Twitter.Timeline = (function () {
   var tweets = [];
   function publishTweet(tweet) {
      tweets.push(tweet);
      //publishing the tweet
   };
   return {
      init: function () {
         $.subscribe('tweet-posted', function (data) {
             publishTweet(data);
         });
      }
   };
}());


var Twitter.TweetPoster = (function () {
   return {
       init: function () {
           $('#postTweet').bind('click', function () {
               var tweet = $('#tweetInput').val();
               $.publish('tweet-posted', tweet);
           });
       }
   };
}());

For this approach there's an excellent talk by Nicholas Zakas. For the MV* approach the best articles and books, I know, are published by Addy Osmani.

Drawbacks. You have to be careful about the excessive use of publish/subscribe. If you’ve got hundreds of events it can become very confusing to manage all of them. You may also have collisions if you’re not using namespacing (or not using it in the right way). An advanced implementation of mediator which looks much like an publish/subscribe can be found here https://github.com/ajacksified/Mediator.js. It has namespacing and feature like event “bubbling” which, of course, can be interrupted. Another drawback of the publish/subscribe is the hard unit testing, it may become difficult to isolate the different functions in the modules and test them independently.

I hope that I've helped you and answered the question clear enough.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that makes sense. I am familiar with the MVC pattern as I use it all the time with PHP, but I hadn't thought about it in terms of event-driven programming. :) –  Maccath Nov 22 '12 at 13:44
    
You can think of the publish-subscribe as Observer. This observer just reacts on changes. –  Minko Gechev Nov 22 '12 at 13:51
2  
Very informative answer! –  And Finally Mar 13 '13 at 10:12

The main goal is to reduce coupling between the code. It's a somewhat event-based way of thinking, but the "events" aren't tied to a specific object.

I'll write out a big example below in some pseudo code that looks a bit like JavaScript.

Let's say we have a class Radio and a class Relay:

class Relay {
    function RelaySignal(signal) {
        //do something we don't care about right now
    }
}

class Radio {
    function ReceiveSignal(signal) {
        //how do I send this signal to other relays?
    }
}

Whenever radio receives a signal, we want a number of relays to relay the message in some way. The number and types of relays can differ. We could do it like this:

class Radio {
    var relayList = [];

    function AddRelay(relay) {
        relayList.add(relay);
    }

    function ReceiveSignal(signal) {
        for(relay in relayList) {
            relay.Relay(signal);
        }
    }

}

This works fine. But now imagine we want a different component to also take part of the signals that the Radio class receives, namely Speakers:

(sorry if the analogies aren't top notch...)

class Speakers {
    function PlaySignal(signal) {
        //do something with the signal to create sounds
    }
}

We could repeat the pattern again:

class Radio {
    var relayList = [];
    var speakerList = [];

    function AddRelay(relay) {
        relayList.add(relay);
    }

    function AddSpeaker(speaker) {
        speakerList.add(speaker)
    }

    function ReceiveSignal(signal) {

        for(relay in relayList) {
            relay.Relay(signal);
        }

        for(speaker in speakerList) {
            speaker.PlaySignal(signal);
        }

    }

}

We could make this even better by creating an interface, like "SignalListener", so that we only need one list in the Radio class, and always can call the same function on whatever object we have that wants to listen to the signal. But that still creates a coupling between whatever interface/base class/etc we decide on and the Radio class. Basically whenever you change one of the Radio, Signal or Relay class you have to think about how it could possibly affect the other two classes.

Now let's try something different. Let's create a fourth class named RadioMast:

class RadioMast {

    var receivers = [];

    //this is the "subscribe"
    function RegisterReceivers(signaltype, receiverMethod) {
        //if no list for this type of signal exits, create it
        if(receivers[signaltype] == null) {
            receivers[signaltype] = [];
        }
        //add a subscriber to this signal type
        receivers[signaltype].add(receiverMethod);
    }

    //this is the "publish"
    function Broadcast(signaltype, signal) {
        //loop through all receivers for this type of signal
        //and call them with the signal
        for(receiverMethod in receivers[signaltype]) {
            receiverMethod(signal);
        }
    }
}

Now we have a pattern that we are aware of and we can use it for any number and types of classes as long as they:

  • are aware of the RadioMast (the class handling all the message passing)
  • are aware of the method signature for sending/receiving messages

So we change the Radio class to its final, simple form:

class Radio {
    function ReceiveSignal(signal) {
        RadioMast.Broadcast("specialradiosignal", signal);
    }
}

And we add the speakers and the relay to the RadioMast's receiver list for this type of signal:

RadioMast.RegisterReceivers("specialradiosignal", speakers.PlaySignal);
RadioMast.RegisterReceivers("specialradiosignal", relay.RelaySignal);

Now the Speakers and Relay class has zero knowledge of anything except that they have a method that can receive a signal, and the Radio class, being the publisher, is aware of the RadioMast that it publishes signals to. This is the point of using a message-passing system like publish/subscribe.

share|improve this answer
    
Really great to have a concrete example that shows how implementing the pub/sub pattern can be better than using 'normal' methods! Thank you! –  Maccath Nov 22 '12 at 13:40
1  
You're welcome! Personally I often find that my brain doesn't 'click' when it comes to new patterns/methodologies until I realise an actual problem that it solves for me. The sub/pub pattern is great with architectures that are tightly coupled conceptually but we still want to keep them separate as much as possible. Imagine a game where you have hundreds of objects that all have to react to things happening around them for example, and these objects can be everything: player, bullet, tree, geometry, gui etc etc. –  Anders Holmström Nov 22 '12 at 13:46
2  
JavaScript doesn't have the class keyword. Please emphasize this fact, eg. by classifying your code as pseudo-code. –  Rob W Nov 22 '12 at 14:17
    
Actually in ES6 there's a class keyword. –  Minko Gechev Nov 22 '12 at 14:22
    
Good point, added a mention of this at the start. –  Anders Holmström Nov 22 '12 at 14:23

So that you don't have to hardcode method / function calls, you just publish the event without caring who listens. This makes the publisher independent from subscriber, reducing dependency (or coupling, whatever term you prefer) between 2 different parts of the application.

Here are some disadvantages of coupling as mentioned by wikipedia

Tightly coupled systems tend to exhibit the following developmental characteristics, which are often seen as disadvantages:

  1. A change in one module usually forces a ripple effect of changes in other modules.
  2. Assembly of modules might require more effort and/or time due to the increased inter-module dependency.
  3. A particular module might be harder to reuse and/or test because dependent modules must be included.

Consider something like an object encapsulating business data. It has hard coded method call to update the page whenever the age is set:

var person = {
    name: "John",
    age: 23,

    setAge: function( age ) {
        this.age = age;
        showAge( age );
    }
};

//Different module

function showAge( age ) {
    $("#age").text( age );
}

Now I cannot test the person object without also including the showAge function. Also, if I need to show the age in some other GUI module as well, I need to hardcode that method call in .setAge, and now there is dependencies for 2 unrelated modules in the person object. It's also just hard to maintain when you see those calls being made and they are not even in the same file.

Note that inside the same module, you can of course have direct method calls. But business data and superficial gui behavior should not reside in the same module by any reasonable standards.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the concept of 'dependency' here; where is the dependency in my second example, and where is it missing from my third? I can't see any practical difference between my second and third snippets - it just seems to add a new 'layer' between the function and the event without a real reason. I am probably being blind, but I think I need more pointers. :( –  Maccath Nov 22 '12 at 12:55
1  
Could you provide a sample use case where publish/subscribe would be more appropriate than just making a function that performs the same thing? –  Jeffrey Sweeney Nov 22 '12 at 12:56
    
@JeffreySweeney sure, I am working on it –  Esailija Nov 22 '12 at 12:58
    
@Maccath Simply put: in the third example, you don't know or have to know that removeOrder even exists, so you cannot be dependent on it. In the second example, you have to know. –  Esailija Nov 22 '12 at 13:13
1  
@Esailija - Thank you, I think I understand a bit better. So... if I removed the subscriber entirely, it wouldn't error or anything, it would just do nothing? And would you say this might be useful in a case where you want to perform an action, but wouldn't necessarily know which function is most relevant at the time of publishing, but the subscriber could change depending on other factors? –  Maccath Nov 22 '12 at 13:24

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