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I am using htaccess for URL rewriting to transform URLS this way:

www.url.com/product.php?id=3

into

www.url.com/laptops/

I found out that when the slash / in the end is or isn't there, then relative links are not called the same way (css files or pictures).

I found out that on the Apple website, if you remove the slash at the end of "www.apple.com/mac/" and press enter, the slash will be re-added automatically, this is what I would like to do.

I tried several solutions I found, such as

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteRule ^(.*[^/])$ /$1/ [L,R=301]

But with this solution, if I take out the slash in the end and press enter, the navigator will "rewrite" the exact folder position in the FTP server, resulting in a "file not found" error.

Thank you in advance for your help...

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1 Answer 1

the !-f checks to see if the file exists, which it doesn't as far as I can tell from your example, but I think the rest of your rewrite is good.

RewriteRule ^(.*[^/])$ /$1/ [L,R=301]

However in the example you gave you are redirecting products.php?id=3 to laptop which is a very specific rewrite and would mean you'd have to make a unique rewrite for each url however the one above would add your slash on for you and you would then need an internal rewrite for that exact page to convert it from laptop to products.php?id=3.

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Thank you for your quick answer. Actually I do have a specific rewrite for all the "id" here, and each rewrite will display a different folder name like www.url.com/phones/ for example. The example I wrote will, on localhost, rewrite from localhost/site/phones (with slash removed) to localhost/phones/ (with slash re-added, but the file "site" is gone) –  swindell Nov 22 '12 at 12:56

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