Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem, I only want to get the strings that contains up to 30 characters each time I run it.

import random
test=["test1 up to 30 characters",
      "test2 passing 30 characters easy",
      "test3 up to 30 characters",
      "test4 passing 30 characters easy"]
random.shuffle(test)
if len(test[0])  <= 30:
    print test[0]
elif len(test[0])  >= 30:
    print "Shit"
    print len(test[0])

Edited:****************************************************************************

In the test I will have a variable that will look something like this:

import random
test=["test1 up to "+variable+" characters",
      "test2 passing "+variable+" characters easy",
      "test3 up to "+variable+" characters",
      "test4 passing "+variable+" characters easy"]
random.shuffle(test)
if len(test[0])  <= 30:
    print test[0]
elif len(test[0])  >= 30:
    print "Shit"
    print len(test[0])

That variable will be a mixed number of characters from 5 up to I don't know, let's say 10.

I want the program to select the strings from the list that will contain maximum 30 characters in total. Your solutions just prints out the ones that contains the strings up to 30 characters and that's it. I want it to go back and find the string in the list that will give out a total of 30 characters for every variable each time. I really hope you understand, I am having trouble understanding myself.

Edited *******************************************************************************

Ok, I did this:

import random
test=["test1 up to 30 characters",
      "test2 passing 30 characters easy",
      "test3 up to 30 characters",
      "test4 passing 30 characters easy"]
random.shuffle(test)
print [x for x in test[0:1] if len(x) < 30]

It does what I want, but still gets blanks, like empty []

share|improve this question
1  
Your edit makes no difference - the solutions you've been given will still work as you still end up with a list of strings, each of which still has a length (which will include the length of variable) –  Jon Clements Nov 22 '12 at 13:37
    
i see, i'l give it a test... thank you very much. –  Szigy Sigali Nov 22 '12 at 13:58
add comment

2 Answers

Use a list comprehension:

print [x for x in test if len(x) < 30]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but you might want to explain what a list comprehension is. –  Lattyware Nov 22 '12 at 13:35
1  
This solution is the correct one, you just have to save the list comprehension somewhere instead of printing it.. –  EnricoGiampieri Nov 22 '12 at 13:46
    
Thank you, i'll try it. –  Szigy Sigali Nov 22 '12 at 13:57
    
uau(list comprehension) Thank you, very useful. –  Szigy Sigali Nov 22 '12 at 14:13
add comment

You can't have both <= for good and >= for bad, i.e. you can't have = for both of those. Esentially, the second if should just be an else, since if it's not smaller than or equal to 30, what's left?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.