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Having some trouble getting this right, I have a list of transaction that I have grouped by account in LINQ, that now gives me an enumerable of all the accounts, each with an enumerable of their transactions within. I now want to take that list, and order it by the sum of the transactions of each group, but it doesn't seem to be working, this is what I have so far:

var memberTrans = trans.GroupBy(o => o.ShareAccountId);
var transOrdered = memberTrans.OrderByDescending(o => o.Sum(i => i.TransactionAmount));

The idea being, I can do .First() and get the account that has had the highest net increase during the period, and .Last() to get the account with the lowest net increase.

Assuming I have data as follows (Simplified)

  • Account 1 : 300
  • Account 1 : -300
  • Account 2 : 100
  • Account 3 : 50
  • Account 2 : -20

So the first grouping gives me:

Account 1:

  • Tran: 300
  • Tran:-300

Account 2:

  • Tran: 100
  • Tran:-20

Account 3:

  • Tran:50

Now I'd like to order it by the SUM of the transactions within each group, so we have the list:

Account 2:

  • Tran: 100
  • Tran:-20

Account 3:

  • Tran:50

Account 1:

  • Tran: 300
  • Tran:-300

Hopefully that's clear enough, any help greatly appreciated!

Edit: More code for clarity:

var tranOrder = trans.GroupBy(o => o.ShareAccountId).OrderByDescending(g => g.Sum(t => t.TransactionAmount));

        var bigUp = tranOrder.First().First();
        var bigDown = tranOrder.Last().First(); 
        report.BiggestMovementUp = tranOrder.First().Sum(o => o.TransactionAmount);
        report.BiggestMoverUp =
            (bigUp.Member.Title + " " + bigUp.Member.Forename + " " + bigUp.Member.Surname + " - ID " + bigUp.Member.MemberID).Trim();
        report.BiggestMovementDown = tranOrder.Last().Sum(o => o.TransactionAmount);
        report.BiggestMoverDown =
          (bigDown.Member.Title + " " + bigDown.Member.Forename + " " + bigDown.Member.Surname + " - ID " + bigDown.Member.MemberID).Trim();

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1  
Remember to wrap your code in the code format so that it's easier to read. –  LukeHennerley Nov 22 '12 at 13:48
2  
Errors? Exceptions? Your expectation on the result does not correlate with actual result? What exactly is wrong? –  J0HN Nov 22 '12 at 13:50
    
Your LINQ looks pretty spot on to me... What do you get when you try it? –  Rawling Nov 22 '12 at 13:51
    
No exceptions, the list simply does not get put into any order, it remains in it's original order –  Daniel Dawes Nov 22 '12 at 13:51
1  
@Daniel Are you still using the original list, rather than using the value of transOrdered? LINQ OrderBy doesn't order the original, it creates an ordered "view" of the original. –  Rawling Nov 22 '12 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  var v = (from acc in accs
           group acc by acc.ShareAccountId into g
           orderby g.Sum(x => x.TransactionAmount) descending
           select g.Sum(x => x.TransactionAmount));

That should do it, you can do whatever you want in the select. I tested this too.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to do the trick! I am so used to writing the other way of doing it, thanks! –  Daniel Dawes Nov 22 '12 at 14:09
    
@DanielDawes Depends what your used too, this is good for those who are more SQL driven then .NET as you can interpret it like that - the other way is more if you like lambdas and .NET in my opinion. –  LukeHennerley Nov 22 '12 at 14:14
    
Other than the last Select, this is identical to @DanielDawes's original code. I wonder why this works when his doesn't. –  Rawling Nov 22 '12 at 14:23
    
@Rawling it is indeed. I think the select could actually be the difference, because you are trying to order by something your not outputting - I replicated his issue (I was getting 300 and 300 as amounts instead of 400 and 300 for example) once I selected the output that I was ordering it worked. –  LukeHennerley Nov 22 '12 at 14:30
    
@LukeHennerley I just posted an answer more specific to the method chaining in case you were curious –  Justin Pihony Nov 22 '12 at 15:33

How about this:

internal class Program
    {
        private class AccountOperation
        {
            public int Id { get; set; }
            public int Amount { get; set; }
        }

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<AccountOperation> ops = new List<AccountOperation>
            {
                new AccountOperation { Id = 1, Amount = 300},
                new AccountOperation { Id = 1, Amount = -300},
                new AccountOperation { Id = 2, Amount = 100},
                new AccountOperation { Id = 3, Amount = 50},
                new AccountOperation { Id = 2, Amount = -20},
            };

            foreach (var operationsByAccount in ops
                .OrderByDescending(z => z.Amount)  // Orders all amounts descending
                .GroupBy(z => z.Id) // Groups by account ID
                .OrderByDescending(z => z.Sum(z2 => z2.Amount))) // Orders groups of operations per accounts descending (by sum of amounts)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Operation " + operationsByAccount.Key);
                foreach (var operation in operationsByAccount)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("\tAmout " + operation.Amount);
                }
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

Outputs:

  • Operation 2
    • Amout 100
    • Amout -20
  • Operation 3
    • Amout 50
  • Operation 1
    • Amout 300
    • Amout -300
share|improve this answer

For the fix to your method chaining version:

var v = accs.GroupBy(acc => acc.ShareAccountId)
        .OrderByDescending(g => g.Sum(x => x.TransactionAmount))
        .Select( g => g.Sum(x => x.TransactionAmount));

Admittedly, I let Resharper do this for me from the LINQ syntax :)

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