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All right I accept that the title is vague for my problem and I am not able to put it in a more comprehensible manner. I am new to programming and my technical jargon is still developing.

I have two files, file A looks like:

CHROM   POS ID  AGM12   AGM14   AGM15   AGM18 ..
1   14930   rs150145850     0/0 1/1 0/0  0/0 ..
1   14933   rs138566748 0/0 0/0 0/0  0/0 ..
1   63671   rs116440577 0/1 0/0 0/0  0/0 ..
2   808922  rs6594027   0/0 0/0 0/0  0/1 ..
2   753474  rs2073814   1/0 0/0 0/1  0/0 ..
3   753405  rs61770173  0/0 1/1 0/0  1/0 ..
...
...
...

File B looks like:

CHROM   POS rsID    Sample_ID
1   14930   rs150145850 AGM15
2   808922  rs6594027   AGM18
3   753405  rs61770173  AGM12
...
...
...

I am looking to use POS field information (column 2) in File B to replace the content in the corresponding Sample_ID in File A by NA.

For example: the output should look like

CHROM   POS ID  AGM12   AGM14   AGM15   AGM18
1   14930   rs150145850     0/0 1/1 NA   0/0
1   14933   rs138566748 0/0 0/0 0/0  0/0
1   63671   rs116440577 0/1 0/0 0/0  0/0
2   808922  rs6594027   0/0 0/0 0/0  NA
2   753474  rs2073814   1/0 0/0 0/1  0/0
3   753405  rs61770173  NA  1/1 0/0  1/0

How could I do this in Python or Unix?

share|improve this question
1  
just to be clear, you have 2 files. the files are lines of data. the data in both files match via the "POS" key. and you want to replace the contents of the colm listed in file2 in file1 into NA ? - also, can there be duplicates of the same key in file2? –  Inbar Rose Nov 22 '12 at 13:58
    
Hard to tell how the columns are separated, I'd say tab separated but for the first data row of file A. –  MattH Nov 22 '12 at 14:02
    
It looks like the columns are tab delimited? Is SO doing something to turn that tab into spaces? Really, my question is, how to you define the output alignment? –  Henry Gomersall Nov 22 '12 at 14:02
1  
@InbarRose since you mentioned duplicates, i forgot to mention that File A can also have duplicates at "POs' key but the corresponding variable in CHROM could be different. For e.g.: CHROM POS ID AGM12 AGM14 AGM15 AGM18 .. 1 14930 rs150145850 0/0 1/1 0/0 0/0 .. 1 14933 rs138566748 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/0 .. 1 63671 rs116440577 0/1 0/0 0/0 0/0 .. 2 14930 rs1578634 0/0 1/1 0/0 0/0 .. 2 808922 rs6594027 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/1 .. 2 753474 rs2073814 1/0 0/0 0/1 0/0 .. 3 753405 rs61770173 0/0 1/1 0/0 1/0 .. –  jules Nov 22 '12 at 21:35
    
@MattH tab delimited –  jules Nov 22 '12 at 21:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a version that uses the csv module (I'm assuming that your columns are tab delimited).

import csv
import collections

a = 'path/to/a'
b = 'path/to/b'
output = 'output/path'

pos = collections.defaultdict(list)

with open(b) as csvin:
    reader = csv.DictReader(csvin, delimiter='\t')
    for line in reader:
        pos[line['POS']].append(line['Sample_ID'])

with open(a) as csvin, open(output, 'wb') as csvout:
    reader = csv.DictReader(csvin, delimiter='\t')
    writer = csv.DictWriter(csvout, fieldnames=reader.fieldnames, delimiter='\t')
    writer.writeheader()
    for line in reader:
        fields = pos.get(line['POS'], [])
        for field in fields:
            line[field] = 'NA'
        writer.writerow(line)
share|improve this answer

If you don't mind installing some packages, you can do this really neatly with pandas:

A = pandas.DataFrame.from_csv("A.txt", sep="\t", index_col=(0,1))
B = pandas.DataFrame.from_csv("B.txt", sep="\t", index_col=(0,1))

A.join(B) # the resulting dataset

Of course, you'll have to pick up pandas to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
this will not solve his problem, he is not merging data, he is replacing data in columns with NA where the colum for the data key is in the second file. –  Inbar Rose Nov 22 '12 at 14:51
    
@InbarRose good point -- A.join(B, how="outer") will do that. –  katrielalex Nov 22 '12 at 15:28

try this one out.

def method(file1, file2, fileout):
    d1, d2, headers = {}
    i = 1
    with open(file1) as f1:  
        for line in f1:
            vars = line.split('\t') #i am assuming tab seperated
            d1[vars[1]] = [vars[0]] + vars[2:]
    with open(file2) as f2:
        for line in f2:
            vars = line.split('\t')
            d2[vars[1]] = vars[2]
    for header in d1['POS']:
        headers[header] = i
        i+=1
    with open(fileout, 'w') as fo:
        fo.write("%s\tPOS\t%s\n" % (d1['POS'][0], "\t".join(d1['POS'][1:]))
        del d1['POS']         
        for key, values in d1.items():
            if key in d2:
                d1[key][headers[d2[key]]] = "NA"
            fo.write("%s\t%s\t%s\n" % (values[0], key, "\t".join(values[1:])))
share|improve this answer
2  
It probably makes sense to use the csv module for this. –  Henry Gomersall Nov 22 '12 at 14:44
    
yes, but i like writing answers that use the least amount of imports as possible, especially when beginners are involved. –  Inbar Rose Nov 22 '12 at 14:45
    
fair enough. I suppose though it's a useful point to know that there is a (batteries included) module to do most of the annoying bits of this. There are quite a few pitfalls in handling csv files (whitespace, quoted values etc) –  Henry Gomersall Nov 22 '12 at 14:47
1  
@InbarRose -1 no, not "fair enough" -- beginners should be taught always to use the "batteries-included" libraries! –  katrielalex Nov 22 '12 at 15:28
1  
@InbarRose since you mentioned duplicates, i forgot to mention that File A can also have duplicates at "POs' key but the corresponding variable in CHROM could be different. For e.g.: CHROM POS ID AGM12 AGM14 AGM15 AGM18 .. 1 14930 rs150145850 0/0 1/1 0/0 0/0 .. ... 2 14930 rs1578634 0/0 1/1 0/0 0/0 .. 2 808922 rs6594027 0/0 0/0 0/0 0/1 .. I want to replace the data point at the intersection of the matched POS/and CHROM key with the Sample_ID in File 1 –  jules Nov 22 '12 at 21:44

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