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Every reference on google only shows eazy examples, I have this case on a code:


   X_TO_BUS_HANDLER( some::SomeClassX,
                     foo::SomeHandler );

Does any one know how this define works? One pattern and two token-lists? References please.

I egrepED the code but only found X_TO_BUS_HANDLER been used.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The C/C++ preprocessor will replace the pattern for everything that is written in the same line. In your case it looks as if the two token after that pattern are themselves macros, so they will get expanded as well.

Some example:

#define F(x, y) x f(y yParam);
#define G(x, y) y g(x xParam);
#define FG(x, y) F(x, y) G(x, y);

FG(int, double)

//this is the same as:
int f(double yParam);
double g(int xParam);

In your case I guess the two defines X_FROM_... and X_TO_... create some functions or classes that are handlers for passing an X from or to some bus, respectively. The XHANDLER macro will create handlers for both directions.

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It works like any other define - whenever the preprocessor encounters XHANDLER, it replaces it with X_TO_BUS_HANDLER(A,B,H) X_FROM_BUS_HANDLER(A,B,H) (and parameters).

In your snippet, the macro isn't used.

But something like

XHANDLER(some::SomeClassX, bus::SomeBus, foo::SomeHandler) 

would be equivalent to

X_TO_BUS_HANDLER(some::SomeClassX, bus::SomeBus, foo::SomeHandler) X_FROM_BUS_HANDLER(some::SomeClassX, bus::SomeBus, foo::SomeHandler)
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So it's a way to fill both at once? Nice... – Rodrigo Gurgel Nov 22 '12 at 15:44

Remember that the preprocessor simply replaces macros with their body. So usage of the macro

XHANDLER(a, b, c)

is simply replaced by the text

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except when X_TO_BUS_HANDLER and X_FROM_BUS_HANDLER are not mere text but macros themselves, then they will be expanded as well ;) – Arne Mertz Nov 22 '12 at 14:19

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